Global K-12 Talent Management Software Market Analysis to 2022 Business Report and Forecasts

 “Global K-12 Talent Management Software Market Research Report 2017”, Purchase This Report by calling ResearchnReports.com at +1-888-631-6977.

K-12 Talent Management Software Market in the US 2017-2022

About Talent Management Software

Talent management software is an application that provides a complete set of tools to organizations to automate, monitor, and analyze various HR functions efficiently. Moreover, the software assists the HR department in better talent acquisition activities, effective retention, and career succession planning strategies. Therefore, talent management applications have been gaining prominence in institutions as well.

Researcher analysts forecast the US K-12 talent management software market to grow at a CAGR of 14.57% during the period 2017-2022.

Covered in this report

The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the US K-12 talent management software market for 2017-2022. To calculate the market size, the report considers the revenue generated by the talent management software providers for the K-12 education market.

The market is divided into the following segments based on geography:

ROW

UK

US

Researcher report, US K-12 Talent Management Software Market 2017-2022, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market.

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Key vendors

Cornerstone OnDemand

Halogen Software

PeopleAdmin

Other prominent vendors

Ellucian

IBM

iCIMS

Infor Global Solutions

Oracle

SAP SE

SumTotal Systems

Workday

Market driver

Growing improvement in employee engagement

For a full, detailed list, view our report

Market challenge

Rising threat from open-source platforms

For a full, detailed list, view our report

Market trend

Rise in cloud-based software solutions

For a full, detailed list, view our report

 

Key questions answered in this report

 

What will the market size be in 2021 and what will the growth rate be?

What are the key market trends?

What is driving this market?

What are the challenges to market growth?

Who are the key vendors in this market space?

What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the key vendors?

What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors?

 

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https://www.researchnreports.com/enquiry_before_buying.php?id=90299

 

Commenting on the report, an analyst from Researcher team said: “The increased use of smartphones for talent acquisition is a major trend in the market. At present, smartphones and tablets are being used by job applicants to access job-related information. Candidates are increasingly using these devices to connect with recruiters anytime and anywhere. With an increase in the adoption rate of smartphone and tablets, vendors are launching applications that could be used for employment opportunities by candidates at their convenience. Halogen Software started one of its offering Halogen Mobile, which is a mobile intranet integrated with social networking capabilities, including chat. This helps users manage goals, employee directories, and provide feedback in real time.”

 

 

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Research N Reports is a new age market research firm where we focus on providing information that can be effectively applied. Today being a consumer driven market, companies require information to deal with the complex and dynamic world of choices. Where relying on a sound board firm for your decisions becomes crucial. Research N Reports specializes in industry analysis, market forecasts and as a result getting quality reports covering all verticals, whether be it gaining perspective on current market conditions or being ahead in the cut throat Asia-Pacific  competition. Since we excel at business research to help businesses grow, we also offer consulting as an extended arm to our services which only helps us gain more insight into current trends and problems. Consequently we keep evolving as an all-rounder provider of viable information under one roof.

 

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Virginia Organizing to Hold Media Conference to Call on School Board to Meet with Community Groups

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For Immediate Release: June 5, 2017

What: Media conference with Lynchburg parents and community leaders to call on the Lynchburg School Board to meet with Virginia Organizing and other community groups

When: Tuesday, June 6 at 5 p.m.

Where: Lynchburg School Administration Building (915 Court Street, Lynchburg, VA 24504)

Speakers:

Pastor Reason Chandler, Virginia Organizing Lynchburg Chapter

Community members concerned about suspension rates


Lynchburg, Va.— Virginia Organizing will hold a media conference on Tuesday, June 6 at 5 p.m. to call on the Lynchburg School Board to meet with community groups who are working to reduce and find alternatives to suspensions in Lynchburg schools. The media conference will be held prior to the school board meeting at the Lynchburg School Administration Building (915 Court Street, Lynchburg, VA 24504). At the conclusion of the media conference, Virginia Organizing members will attend the school board meeting to directly address school board members.

Pastor Reason Chandler’s daughter, a student at Dunbar Middle School, has personal experience with unjust suspensions as a result of the discipline system in Lynchburg.“Throughout middle school my daughter received frequent referrals and would call me feeling frustrated and confused,” said Pastor Chandler, a leader in the Lynchburg Chapter of Virginia Organizing.“Luckily, I have a flexible work schedule and was able to hurry to the school to advocate for her before she received an unjustly harsh punishment. Eventually, my wife and I sat down with her principal and teachers to talk about the way my daughter was being treated. Since that conversation at the beginning of the school year she only received one referral. We are thrilled things have improved for her but worry about the students whose parents aren’t able to advocate for them. That is why we have to create systemic changes to improve our discipline process; but before we can do that, we have to have access to our school board members.”

“I feel passionately about keeping kids in school because I recognize the importance of the role of education for our youth to overcome the cycle of poverty,” said Virginia Organizing Lynchburg Chapter leader Vicente Gonzalez. “Virginia Organizing asks that the school board members schedule meetings with our chapter and other community groups so we can jumpstart this conversation and work toward actively finding alternatives for suspensions and end this epidemic of removing kids from the learning environment.”

For more information, or to interview a spokesperson, please contact Haley Wilson at 434-907-6116 or haley@virginia-organizing.org.

Virginia Organizing is a non-partisan statewide grassroots organization that brings people together to create a more just Virginia.

2017-06-05

Virginia Organizing to Hold Media Conference to Call on School Board to Meet with Community Groups

Reviewed by Nik Belanger on Jun 05. What: Media conference with Lynchburg parents and community leaders to call on the Lynchburg School Board to meet with Virginia Organizing and other community g

What: Media conference with Lynchburg parents and community leaders to call on the Lynchburg School Board to meet with Virginia Organizing and other community g

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AG Rosenblums Student Debt Bill Passes out of Oregon House; Moves to Governors Desk

​The Oregon House today passed the Attorney General’s bill designed to help Oregon’s students and their families better understand their education related debt obligations. The proposed legislation, Senate Bill 253, would require Oregon colleges and universities to send students annual, easy-to-understand letters explaining the scope of their federal educational debt. The bill already passed the Senate unanimously and will now move to the Governor’s desk.

Under the proposed legislation, every student who receives a federal educational loan will annually receive an estimate of the total amount of federal loans the student has taken out, and the total potential payoff amount over the life of the loan. Students will also receive an estimated monthly payment applicable after graduation.

College tuition is skyrocketing throughout Oregon, and the financial aid process comes with mountains of paperwork. With so much buried in the fine print, it can be easy to miss how much a student will actually owe at graduation,” said Attorney General Rosenblum. “Given the huge expense involved, it is just common sense that a student should receive a clear statement of the real financial obligations they will face after graduation.”

In 2015, roughly 63 percent of students graduating from Oregon’s colleges and universities had education related debt, averaging $26,000.

Similar laws passed in other states have had promising results. Indiana University saw a roughly 16 percent reduction in student borrowing, which accounted for $44 million in debt savings, when they started sending annual student debt letters during the 2012-2013 academic year. Since then, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Washington have passed similar legislation.

University of Arizona biomedical engineering undergraduate Samantha Davidson spent her final class of the spring semester sitting in the sun sorting Skittle candies by color.

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„What a great way to end the semester!” she said.

Davidson was among 80 undergraduates, including 49 biomedical engineering sophomores, testing 36 Skittle-sorting machines their teams had created as part of a new design course. The challenge: to accurately sort the highest number of Skittles in the least amount of time.

The competition was the culmination of a new undergraduate course for students in the College of Engineering’s biomedical engineering department and in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences’ School of Information.

I never had the experience before of using computer programming to design and build a working machine,” said biomedical engineering sophomore Alexys Manring. The experience will come in handy for her summer internship working on computer programming for irrigation systems for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The course was co-taught by Urs Utzinger, professor of biomedical engineering, and David Lesser, a UA graduate student who serves on the board of Xerocraft, a Tucson hackerspace and makerspace group. The course supported the College of Engineering’s commitment to incorporating hands-on design experience into the full undergraduate curriculum. The college plans to adapt it for its other undergraduate programs.

„We started with BME, since biomedical engineers design biomedical systems and products and must be familiar with the technical processes for maintaining them,” Utzinger said. Such equipment might include pill-sorting machines, which some of the Skittle sorters resembled.

The iSchool class, ISTA 303 Creative Coding, had 20 junior and senior students this past spring and was taught by Peter Jansen, an assistant professor in the School of Information.

„I designed this course to be about learning introductory rapid prototyping skills in a very hands-on way,” Jansen said.

The course included a number of skill-building projects that teach aspects such as sensors and visualization to basics about robotics. The students were required to extend their projects in some way, through coding, visualization or additional rapid prototyping. 

From Solar Ovens to Skittle Sorters

UA engineering freshmen take the introductory course ENGR 102 to learn fundamental concepts of modeling, design and construction. The course requires them to build solar ovens in teams, then compete to best predict their ovens’ performance at the Solar Oven Throw Down. Seniors participate in a capstone engineering design program and display their sponsored projects at Design Day. 

Now sophomores have the maker course, which may also be adapted for juniors.

„Five-four-three-two-one … start your Skittle sorters!” Lesser shouted before each three-minute round of four competing teams. A cacophony rose as students dumped packets of 60 Skittles into funneled hoppers and the candies cascaded down chutes for routing into one of five cups for red, orange, purple, yellow or green Skittles. Students made many of their components using 3-D printers and laser cutters. Microprocessors, servo actuators and power supplies kept the student-built machines humming.

Some teams encountered trouble with their systems for detecting the candies’ colors, but the failure was a valuable lesson in itself.

Their systems worked flawlessly inside the new makerspace created for the course, but were less responsive in the natural light of the Engineering Building courtyard, where the contest took place. 

„We had programmed an image-processing system into our software to identify hues in the lab, but the values changed when we took the machine outside,” Davidson said.

„But isn’t that often the case?” Lesser said. „Practice sessions go smoothly, but at the crucial moment systems disappoint. It’s a fact of life for professional engineers.”

First- and second-place honors went to iSchool teams. Benjamin David Shields and Shlishaa Savita won first place for their sorter. Shields said their fastest round at the competition was 34 seconds for 60 Skittles with 100 percent accuracy.

„We spent a lot of time working on the code to detect Skittle colors as accurately as possible, while trying to mitigate the ambient light of the environment,” Shields said. „There was an abundance of incredibly clever and powerful designs that day at the competition.”

Real Skills for Real Application

Shields, who graduated with a bachelor’s degree in computer science in May, said he enjoyed the workshop style of ISTA 303.

„Peter Jansen taught us real skills that I can apply when using 3-D printers, laser cutters, building circuits and programming micro-controllers,” Shields said. „It was extremely fulfilling to make tons of mistakes, learn from each and every one, and finally show friends something that you built, something that childhood Ben would never have dreamed was possible in this day and age.”

Said Jansen: „The Skittle-sorting competition was a fantastic learning experience for the students. On the surface, sorting Skittles by sensing their color is conceptually straightforward. But the secret is all in the details.”

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Kulkarni appointed dean of the faculty at Princeton University

Sanjeev Kulkarni, dean of the Princeton University Graduate School and a professor of electrical engineering, has been appointed dean of the faculty effective July 1.

Sanjeev Kulkarni, dean of the Princeton University Graduate School since 2014 and a professor electrical engineering, has been appointed dean of the faculty effective July 1.

Photo courtesy of the Graduate School

President Christopher L. Eisgruber recommended the appointment, which the Board of Trustees approved at their June 5 meeting. Kulkarni will succeed Deborah Prentice, who will become University provost on July 1.

Sanj Kulkarni has served with distinction as dean of the Graduate School, and I am delighted that he has agreed to take on this new role,” Eisgruber said. „His own interdisciplinary research, his wide-ranging service to the University and his leadership of the Graduate School have given him a deep appreciation for the values shared throughout our University and the scholarly practices that distinguish our departments.

„Sanj is a wise counselor and an effective administrator who is dedicated to ensuring our faculty’s quality and well-being. I am confident that he will be an excellent dean of the faculty,” Eisgruber said.

Kulkarni, who became dean of the Graduate School in April 2014, is an associated faculty member in the Department of Operations Research and Financial Engineering (ORFE) and in the Department of Philosophy.

Kulkarni said he is delighted to have the opportunity to serve the University in this new role. “Faculty are the foundation of any great university, and it will be a pleasure and an honor to work with and support Princeton’s outstanding faculty. I look forward to working with scholars, teachers, and researchers across the full range of academic departments and programs at the University,” he said.

As dean of the Graduate School, Kulkarni led the strategic planning Task Force on the Future of the Graduate School, implemented a sixth-year funding program for graduate students in the humanities and social sciences, and with the dean for research implemented tuition matching funds for faculty who support fourth- and fifth-year graduate students on sponsored research.

Under Kulkarni’s leadership, the Graduate School created an assistant dean position for professional development and developed a number of new programs including the University Administrative Fellows, opportunities for collaborative teaching between Princeton faculty and graduate students, and a partnership with Mercer County Community College to provide teaching opportunities and mentorship for Princeton graduate students.

Over the past three years, the Graduate School also increased the diversity of entering graduate student cohorts, enhanced student life activities, boosted the integration of graduate students into the University community, and advanced discussions on housing for graduate students as part of the University’s campus planning effort. Kulkarni has also been active in alumni engagement, hosting events on campus and visiting alumni groups across the country and abroad.

Kulkarni has had a distinguished career as a researcher, educator and administrator at Princeton, where he joined the faculty in 1991. He served as associate dean for academic affairs in the School of Engineering and Applied Science from 2003 to 2005; was the head of Butler College, an undergraduate residential college, from 2004 to 2012; and from 2011 to 2014 was director of the Keller Center, which has the broad aim to “educate leaders for a technology-driven society.”

Kulkarni holds a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics, all from Clarkson University. After completing a master’s degree in electrical engineering at Stanford University, he earned his Ph.D. in electrical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

His research interests include statistical pattern recognition, machine learning, nonparametric estimation, information theory, wireless networks, signal/image/video processing, and econometrics and finance. He has worked extensively with colleagues in philosophy, computer science, psychology and ORFE.

Kulkarni received an Army Research Office Young Investigator Award in 1992, and a National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award in 1994. He has also received several teaching awards at Princeton, including the President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching in 2007, and seven awards from the Undergraduate Engineering Council for courses on computer vision, image processing, and signals and systems.

Kulkarni is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and he has served as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory. He is on the Board of Trustees for Clarkson University.

He has served as a trustee of Princeton University Press, and has been on the Healthier Princeton Advisory Board, the Frist Campus Center Advisory Board and the Alcohol Coalition Committee. He currently serves on the Sustainability Steering Council, the faculty advisory committee for Labyrinth Books and the Princeton Entrepreneurship Council.

Prentice, Princeton’s Alexander Stewart 1886 Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs, was named dean of the faculty in 2014 after serving for 12 years as the chair of the Department of Psychology. As provost, she will succeed David S. Lee, a professor of economics and public affairs who is returning to the faculty.

Prentice will lead a committee to search for a successor to Kulkarni, and its work will begin immediately. During the interim, Cole Crittenden, deputy dean of the Graduate School, will serve as acting dean.

Kulkarni appointed dean of the faculty at Princeton University

Sanjeev Kulkarni, dean of the Princeton University Graduate School and a professor of electrical engineering, has been appointed dean of the faculty effective July 1.

Sanjeev Kulkarni, dean of the Princeton University Graduate School since 2014 and a professor electrical engineering, has been appointed dean of the faculty effective July 1.

Photo courtesy of the Graduate School

President Christopher L. Eisgruber recommended the appointment, which the Board of Trustees approved at their June 5 meeting. Kulkarni will succeed Deborah Prentice, who will become University provost on July 1.

Sanj Kulkarni has served with distinction as dean of the Graduate School, and I am delighted that he has agreed to take on this new role,” Eisgruber said. „His own interdisciplinary research, his wide-ranging service to the University and his leadership of the Graduate School have given him a deep appreciation for the values shared throughout our University and the scholarly practices that distinguish our departments.

„Sanj is a wise counselor and an effective administrator who is dedicated to ensuring our faculty’s quality and well-being. I am confident that he will be an excellent dean of the faculty,” Eisgruber said.

Kulkarni, who became dean of the Graduate School in April 2014, is an associated faculty member in the Department of Operations Research and Financial Engineering (ORFE) and in the Department of Philosophy.

Kulkarni said he is delighted to have the opportunity to serve the University in this new role. “Faculty are the foundation of any great university, and it will be a pleasure and an honor to work with and support Princeton’s outstanding faculty. I look forward to working with scholars, teachers, and researchers across the full range of academic departments and programs at the University,” he said.

As dean of the Graduate School, Kulkarni led the strategic planning Task Force on the Future of the Graduate School, implemented a sixth-year funding program for graduate students in the humanities and social sciences, and with the dean for research implemented tuition matching funds for faculty who support fourth- and fifth-year graduate students on sponsored research.

Under Kulkarni’s leadership, the Graduate School created an assistant dean position for professional development and developed a number of new programs including the University Administrative Fellows, opportunities for collaborative teaching between Princeton faculty and graduate students, and a partnership with Mercer County Community College to provide teaching opportunities and mentorship for Princeton graduate students.

Over the past three years, the Graduate School also increased the diversity of entering graduate student cohorts, enhanced student life activities, boosted the integration of graduate students into the University community, and advanced discussions on housing for graduate students as part of the University’s campus planning effort. Kulkarni has also been active in alumni engagement, hosting events on campus and visiting alumni groups across the country and abroad.

Kulkarni has had a distinguished career as a researcher, educator and administrator at Princeton, where he joined the faculty in 1991. He served as associate dean for academic affairs in the School of Engineering and Applied Science from 2003 to 2005; was the head of Butler College, an undergraduate residential college, from 2004 to 2012; and from 2011 to 2014 was director of the Keller Center, which has the broad aim to “educate leaders for a technology-driven society.”

Kulkarni holds a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics, all from Clarkson University. After completing a master’s degree in electrical engineering at Stanford University, he earned his Ph.D. in electrical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

His research interests include statistical pattern recognition, machine learning, nonparametric estimation, information theory, wireless networks, signal/image/video processing, and econometrics and finance. He has worked extensively with colleagues in philosophy, computer science, psychology and ORFE.

Kulkarni received an Army Research Office Young Investigator Award in 1992, and a National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award in 1994. He has also received several teaching awards at Princeton, including the President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching in 2007, and seven awards from the Undergraduate Engineering Council for courses on computer vision, image processing, and signals and systems.

Kulkarni is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and he has served as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory. He is on the Board of Trustees for Clarkson University.

He has served as a trustee of Princeton University Press, and has been on the Healthier Princeton Advisory Board, the Frist Campus Center Advisory Board and the Alcohol Coalition Committee. He currently serves on the Sustainability Steering Council, the faculty advisory committee for Labyrinth Books and the Princeton Entrepreneurship Council.

Prentice, Princeton’s Alexander Stewart 1886 Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs, was named dean of the faculty in 2014 after serving for 12 years as the chair of the Department of Psychology. As provost, she will succeed David S. Lee, a professor of economics and public affairs who is returning to the faculty.

Prentice will lead a committee to search for a successor to Kulkarni, and its work will begin immediately. During the interim, Cole Crittenden, deputy dean of the Graduate School, will serve as acting dean.

Kulkarni appointed dean of the faculty at Princeton University

Sanjeev Kulkarni, dean of the Princeton University Graduate School and a professor of electrical engineering, has been appointed dean of the faculty effective July 1.

Sanjeev Kulkarni, dean of the Princeton University Graduate School since 2014 and a professor electrical engineering, has been appointed dean of the faculty effective July 1.

Photo courtesy of the Graduate School

President Christopher L. Eisgruber recommended the appointment, which the Board of Trustees approved at their June 5 meeting. Kulkarni will succeed Deborah Prentice, who will become University provost on July 1.

Sanj Kulkarni has served with distinction as dean of the Graduate School, and I am delighted that he has agreed to take on this new role,” Eisgruber said. „His own interdisciplinary research, his wide-ranging service to the University and his leadership of the Graduate School have given him a deep appreciation for the values shared throughout our University and the scholarly practices that distinguish our departments.

„Sanj is a wise counselor and an effective administrator who is dedicated to ensuring our faculty’s quality and well-being. I am confident that he will be an excellent dean of the faculty,” Eisgruber said.

Kulkarni, who became dean of the Graduate School in April 2014, is an associated faculty member in the Department of Operations Research and Financial Engineering (ORFE) and in the Department of Philosophy.

Kulkarni said he is delighted to have the opportunity to serve the University in this new role. “Faculty are the foundation of any great university, and it will be a pleasure and an honor to work with and support Princeton’s outstanding faculty. I look forward to working with scholars, teachers, and researchers across the full range of academic departments and programs at the University,” he said.

As dean of the Graduate School, Kulkarni led the strategic planning Task Force on the Future of the Graduate School, implemented a sixth-year funding program for graduate students in the humanities and social sciences, and with the dean for research implemented tuition matching funds for faculty who support fourth- and fifth-year graduate students on sponsored research.

Under Kulkarni’s leadership, the Graduate School created an assistant dean position for professional development and developed a number of new programs including the University Administrative Fellows, opportunities for collaborative teaching between Princeton faculty and graduate students, and a partnership with Mercer County Community College to provide teaching opportunities and mentorship for Princeton graduate students.

Over the past three years, the Graduate School also increased the diversity of entering graduate student cohorts, enhanced student life activities, boosted the integration of graduate students into the University community, and advanced discussions on housing for graduate students as part of the University’s campus planning effort. Kulkarni has also been active in alumni engagement, hosting events on campus and visiting alumni groups across the country and abroad.

Kulkarni has had a distinguished career as a researcher, educator and administrator at Princeton, where he joined the faculty in 1991. He served as associate dean for academic affairs in the School of Engineering and Applied Science from 2003 to 2005; was the head of Butler College, an undergraduate residential college, from 2004 to 2012; and from 2011 to 2014 was director of the Keller Center, which has the broad aim to “educate leaders for a technology-driven society.”

Kulkarni holds a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics, all from Clarkson University. After completing a master’s degree in electrical engineering at Stanford University, he earned his Ph.D. in electrical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

His research interests include statistical pattern recognition, machine learning, nonparametric estimation, information theory, wireless networks, signal/image/video processing, and econometrics and finance. He has worked extensively with colleagues in philosophy, computer science, psychology and ORFE.

Kulkarni received an Army Research Office Young Investigator Award in 1992, and a National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award in 1994. He has also received several teaching awards at Princeton, including the President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching in 2007, and seven awards from the Undergraduate Engineering Council for courses on computer vision, image processing, and signals and systems.

Kulkarni is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and he has served as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory. He is on the Board of Trustees for Clarkson University.

He has served as a trustee of Princeton University Press, and has been on the Healthier Princeton Advisory Board, the Frist Campus Center Advisory Board and the Alcohol Coalition Committee. He currently serves on the Sustainability Steering Council, the faculty advisory committee for Labyrinth Books and the Princeton Entrepreneurship Council.

Prentice, Princeton’s Alexander Stewart 1886 Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs, was named dean of the faculty in 2014 after serving for 12 years as the chair of the Department of Psychology. As provost, she will succeed David S. Lee, a professor of economics and public affairs who is returning to the faculty.

Prentice will lead a committee to search for a successor to Kulkarni, and its work will begin immediately. During the interim, Cole Crittenden, deputy dean of the Graduate School, will serve as acting dean.

New Book Unravels the Emergence of Romania’s “Children of the Republic” Through Political Conflict and the Country’s Tumultuous Past

A Look at the Country’s Past and its Impact on the Lives of Romanians!

WEST PALM BEACH, FL – 6 Jun, 2017 – Authors Matei Cazacu, Ioana Cre?oiu and Ladislau G. Hajos pull back the curtain on the early days of Romania’s Democracy, a rich and intriguing part of the country’s past that seemed to be lost in the pages of history, until now.

When the name ‘Romania’ comes up in a conversation, it is usually referred to as the backdrop where Bram Stoker’s legendary creation ‘Dracula’ allegedly took place. That would only be testament to our parochial view of this otherwise culturally vibrant country with a gloomy and gothic past. But Romania is so much more than that. It is “A unique nation that invites and welcomes all cultures as if it were its own family members” as one of the authors of the book put it.

The book, ‘Story of Our Generation – From Monarchy to Democracy’ touches on all aspects of Romania’s dodgy past, from the gritty and rampant criminality of the ruling parties to the affects of communism, and a revolution as seen through the eyes of a generation of Romanians.

The authors have been diplomatically brutal with the way Romania’s generation “Children of the Republic” view the country’s history, which sadly, has not been as peaceful as its geography. When asked about the contexts of the book, one of the authors replied, “The book is a series of in-depth and personal accounts from a generation that grew up under four political regimes and survived, which makes for a riveting read.”

Ladislau G. Hajos continued, “The idea to bring together all of our stories came after Matei, Ioana and myself decided to write about this important time in history, at the 50th year of graduating from Spiru Haret High School in 1964. It was very interesting to revisit that part of Romania’s history, and the part we all played in it, and the way those experiences had shaped all of our lives. In short, the concept of the book is an examination of the interplay of social/political turbulence on a generation of students. This, I feel has been accomplished in the book.”

During the launch, Hajos said, “The impact of growing up in a country where there was constant change couched in secrecy, is isolation. With isolation, there is paralysis. Each of us thought that we were alone in the trauma that we experienced. As a result, there was little chance to change the system. We lived in fear. We lived in secrecy. We lived with chaos. We lived with the belief that we were unable to affect the revolution.”

The feeling of isolation and overwhelming hopelessness that comes along with a country torn to pieces has been described beautifully in ‘Story of Our Generation – From Monarchy to Democracies.’ The book is available now and is worth a read for history buffs, students of history and all those who are interested in learning more about the fascinating dynamics and complexities of Southeastern Europe in the 50s and 60s.

Authors’ Bio

Ladislau G. Hajos: Born in 1946 in Bucharest, he has lived in Bucharest and the USA. He holds a Master’s Degree in Electrical Engineering. He is presently retired and living in West Palm Beach, Florida. He has written two autobiographies that have been published in the USA. He can be reached at lhajos@gmail.com or by phone 856.305.3601.

Matei Cazacu: Born in 1946 in Sinaia, Romania. He holds a Master’s Degree in History from the University of Bucharest. He earned a PhD in the history and civilization of the Byzantine and post- Byzantine world from the University of Paris I – Panthéon.  He has written a number of books and articles on history.

Ioana Cretoiu (Casassovici): Born in 1946 in Bucharest and currently lives in Romania. She has studied architecture and was an active participant of the rebirth of the country after the political changes of 1989. She studied Political Science from the University of Bucharest and has taken part in various projects aimed at the civic and political participation of women in the EU.

Available on Amazon.com

List Price: $24.95

6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm) 
Black & White on Cream paper
528 pages

ISBN-13: 978-1543184839 
ISBN-10: 1543184839 
BISAC: History / Europe / General,
Biography & Autobiography / Cultural Heritage

Media Contact
Contact Person: Ladislau Hajos
Email: lhajos@gmail.com
Phone: 856.305.3601
Country: United States

Release of CA Schools Mobile App

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SACRAMENTO—State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson today announced the release of the California Department of Education’s (CDE) first mobile application that offers detailed information about California’s 10,000 public schools.

The CA Schools mobile app, developed in-house by the CDE and available for iOS and Android systems, lets users locate nearby schools based on their current location and provides a wealth of details, including contacts and directions, demographics, test scores, and a school’s California School Dashboard profile page.

Never before have we put so much school information literally in the hands of our students, parents, and community members and made the information so accessible and user-friendly,” Torlakson said. “Home buyers can check out schools in their prospective neighborhoods. Parents heading to a child’s away game can map directions to the host school. There are all kinds of potential uses.”

The CA Schools Mobile App draws upon the same data as the CDE’s California School Directory and links to additional content on the CDE’s Web site such as a school’s California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) test results. In addition to location-based searches, users can find schools by city, county, school district, and ZIP code. Users can search specifically for charter schools and even private schools.

The CA Schools mobile app is available for free download through Apple’s App Store Web page or the Google Play Web page. More information is available on CDE’s CA Schools Mobile Application support Web page.

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Akamai Foundation to Award Top High School Math Students With $45,000 in College Scholarships

Cambridge, MA |

The Akamai Foundation today announced that it will award three high school math students with scholarships for their placement in the recent United States of America Mathematical Olympiad, the final invitational exam in a challenging series of MAA American Mathematics Competitions math exams. An awards ceremony for the forty-sixth USAMO winners will be held today, June 5th in Washington D.C.

The Akamai Foundation, established in 2000 and funded solely through donations from Akamai (NASDAQ: AKAM) employees and individuals outside the company, promotes the pursuit of excellence in mathematics in grades K-12 to encourage the next generation of technology innovators.

The Akamai Foundation will present Akamai Scholarships to the top three winners of this year’s competition, the most prestigious math competition for high school students. These top three scorers are among the most talented young mathematicians in North America.

Andrew Gu from Allerdice High School, Pittsburgh, PA, tied for first place and will be awarded an Akamai Scholarship in the amount of $17,500.

Kada Williams from the U.S., who attends Radnoti Miklos Experimental Grammar School in Budapest, Hungary, tied for first place and will be awarded an Akamai Scholarship in the amount of $17,500.

Victor Rong from Marc Garneau Collegiate Institute in Toronto, Canada, took third place and will be awarded an Akamai Scholarship in the amount of $10,000.

300,000 students participated in the MAA American Mathematics Competitions (AMC), organized by the Mathematical Association of America, culminating in the 46th Annual United States of America Mathematical Olympiad (USAMO). The USAMO provides a means of identifying and encouraging the most creative mathematics students in North America with a six-question, nine-hour essay/proof examination conducted over two days.

“We congratulate this year’s winners. The Akamai Foundation is proud to support students with emerging talent and skills in mathematics,” said Dr. Tom Leighton, CEO and co-founder, Akamai. “The Akamai Foundation is committed to helping promote mathematics education and to encouraging and inspiring the next generation of technology innovators and leaders.

“The Mathematical Association of America celebrates all the students who participated in the USAMO and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions this year, and special congratulations to the top students,” said Michael Pearson, the executive director of the Mathematical Association of America. “We are very grateful for the Akamai Foundation’s continued support of these top math students, and for their leadership in the mathematical community.”

About the MAA

The Mathematical Association of America is the world’s largest community of mathematicians, students, and enthusiasts. We accelerate the understanding of our world through mathematics because mathematics drives society and shapes our lives. The MAA organizes the MAA American Mathematics Competitions to strengthen the mathematical capabilities of the next generation of problem solvers.

About the Akamai Foundation

The Akamai Foundation was established in 2000 and is funded solely by Akamai executives, its employees and individuals outside the company. The Akamai Foundation is dedicated to excellence in mathematics, with the aim of promoting math’s importance and encouraging America’s next generation of technology innovators.