Quick 5 questions with Fatema Tajbhai

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2 Jun 2017 Cycling Australia

St Kilda Cycling Club member and 2017 Paracycling (C5) time trial national champion, Fatema (Fats) Tajbhai is a pretty amazing individual. 

When she’s not donning her Cycles Galleria team kit racing through regional Victoria, you can find her leading one of St Kilda CC’s women recreational rides, chasing down the post-ride coffee and sharing her tips and encouragement with women who are new to the club. 

And like the rest of us, she has an off the bike life too, as a Medical Scientist. We caught up with Fats recently and found out a little bit more about her love of riding.

 

What’s your number one tip for bike riding? i.e. always carry a $5 note. 

I always carry an extra layer. It makes sitting around enjoying your post ride coffee a lot more enjoyable. It is especially important for me at this time of the year as Melbourne weather is so unpredictable.

Favourite post ride cafe and favourite coffee?

Woven in Yarraville is my favourite post ride coffee spot, and it’s always a long black with a bit of hot milk on the side.  As I’m nearing an end of a ride I look forward to it and sometimes it can be bit of a sprint to get there before they shut at 3 pm on the weekends.

How many bikes do you own and what’s your favourite?

Currently, I own 2 bikes.  A road bike and a single speed I use for commuting.  I love my road bike!  I can race on it, train on it and do social rides.  It’s an all-rounder!

If you could be anyone for a day, who would it be and why?

 

Daniel Andrews, Premier of Victoria. I would put cycling safety and cycling infrastructure at the top of my agenda and pass in some laws that are so necessary for cyclist’s safety.

 

Favourite hometown ride?

Anything with some climbs!  Can’t’ beat a good Mt Pleasant loop or a ride out to Kinglake or the Dandenongs.  If I’m short on time the Boulie (Kew Boulevard) is a good option and I love the views of Melbourne from there

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Quick 5 questions with Fatema Tajbhai

Cycling Australia's picture

Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version

2 Jun 2017 Cycling Australia

St Kilda Cycling Club member and 2017 Paracycling (C5) time trial national champion, Fatema (Fats) Tajbhai is a pretty amazing individual. 

When she’s not donning her Cycles Galleria team kit racing through regional Victoria, you can find her leading one of St Kilda CC’s women recreational rides, chasing down the post-ride coffee and sharing her tips and encouragement with women who are new to the club. 

And like the rest of us, she has an off the bike life too, as a Medical Scientist. We caught up with Fats recently and found out a little bit more about her love of riding.

 

What’s your number one tip for bike riding? i.e. always carry a $5 note. 

I always carry an extra layer. It makes sitting around enjoying your post ride coffee a lot more enjoyable. It is especially important for me at this time of the year as Melbourne weather is so unpredictable.

Favourite post ride cafe and favourite coffee?

Woven in Yarraville is my favourite post ride coffee spot, and it’s always a long black with a bit of hot milk on the side.  As I’m nearing an end of a ride I look forward to it and sometimes it can be bit of a sprint to get there before they shut at 3 pm on the weekends.

How many bikes do you own and what’s your favourite?

Currently, I own 2 bikes.  A road bike and a single speed I use for commuting.  I love my road bike!  I can race on it, train on it and do social rides.  It’s an all-rounder!

If you could be anyone for a day, who would it be and why?

 

Daniel Andrews, Premier of Victoria. I would put cycling safety and cycling infrastructure at the top of my agenda and pass in some laws that are so necessary for cyclist’s safety.

 

Favourite hometown ride?

Anything with some climbs!  Can’t’ beat a good Mt Pleasant loop or a ride out to Kinglake or the Dandenongs.  If I’m short on time the Boulie (Kew Boulevard) is a good option and I love the views of Melbourne from there

Copy this html code to your website/blog to embed this press release.

Quick 5 questions with Fatema Tajbhai

Cycling Australia's picture

Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version

2 Jun 2017 Cycling Australia

St Kilda Cycling Club member and 2017 Paracycling (C5) time trial national champion, Fatema (Fats) Tajbhai is a pretty amazing individual. 

When she’s not donning her Cycles Galleria team kit racing through regional Victoria, you can find her leading one of St Kilda CC’s women recreational rides, chasing down the post-ride coffee and sharing her tips and encouragement with women who are new to the club. 

And like the rest of us, she has an off the bike life too, as a Medical Scientist. We caught up with Fats recently and found out a little bit more about her love of riding.

 

What’s your number one tip for bike riding? i.e. always carry a $5 note. 

I always carry an extra layer. It makes sitting around enjoying your post ride coffee a lot more enjoyable. It is especially important for me at this time of the year as Melbourne weather is so unpredictable.

Favourite post ride cafe and favourite coffee?

Woven in Yarraville is my favourite post ride coffee spot, and it’s always a long black with a bit of hot milk on the side.  As I’m nearing an end of a ride I look forward to it and sometimes it can be bit of a sprint to get there before they shut at 3 pm on the weekends.

How many bikes do you own and what’s your favourite?

Currently, I own 2 bikes.  A road bike and a single speed I use for commuting.  I love my road bike!  I can race on it, train on it and do social rides.  It’s an all-rounder!

If you could be anyone for a day, who would it be and why?

 

Daniel Andrews, Premier of Victoria. I would put cycling safety and cycling infrastructure at the top of my agenda and pass in some laws that are so necessary for cyclist’s safety.

 

Favourite hometown ride?

Anything with some climbs!  Can’t’ beat a good Mt Pleasant loop or a ride out to Kinglake or the Dandenongs.  If I’m short on time the Boulie (Kew Boulevard) is a good option and I love the views of Melbourne from there

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Connection to bicycles reinforces connection to self, others and community

PhD student Karly Coleman has focused her research on how infrastructure related to bicycles is handled in cities. (Photo by Richard Siemens)

That bike you use to zip to the store or cruise to work? Sure, it’s all gears, rubber and metal—but it’s also your pal, says a University of Alberta researcher.

Like every good friend, it lifts you up when you’re down, takes you where you want to go, doesn’t judge you, lets you escape the dreariness of your day. It helps you make new friends and reconnect with old ones. And, I think your bicycle has done this for you ever since you learned to ride,” said Karly Coleman, who’s just finished pedalling through a master’s thesis, exploring how people’s identities are linked to their bicycles.

Coleman is not alone in her passion for life on two wheels. According to Statistics Canada, in 2013/14, an estimated 12 million Canadians—41 per cent of the population—aged 12 or older reported that they had cycled in the previous year. This number is growing and more people are beginning to use their bicycles for utilitarian purposes.

Safe bike riding

  • Wear a bike helmet.
  • Make sure the helmet fits.
  • Check and maintain your bike.
  • Be seen and be heard. Wear reflective gear and use your bike bell and lights.
  • Be alert and follow traffic rules.

– Courtesy of the Injury Prevention Centre, University of Alberta

Coleman, proud co-owner of 15 bikes with her husband, is now working on a PhD in the U of A’s Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences, focused on how infrastructure related to bicycles is handled in cities. She’s also served as CJSR Radio’s bike reporter since 2007 and has been involved with several bike-oriented associations, including the Edmonton Bicycle Commuters Society and the Bikeology festival.

She discusses her research insights below.

What made you want to study bicycling as a master’s thesis topic?

“I started looking at how bicycles are talked about in academia. Lots of researchers talk about bikes in terms of fitness or sports or road conditions and the built environment, but no one was looking at why people choose to ride a bike in the first place. What is it about the bicycle that makes it so compelling? How does it foster feelings of nostalgia and competence and relatedness? How does it help you meet people, be part of a community? I wanted to explore the attachment people feel to the bike, and then to other people and places because they ride that bike.”

How is a bike more than a bike?

“My research found that people are really attached to their bicycles for all kinds of reasons. When they are using them to get to work, to run errands, to see friends, they encounter a different way of living that is unique and really compelling. It brings out self-sufficiency and self-reliance—which are also nostalgic feelings. A bike is one of the few things from childhood that is still used in much the same way in adulthood, so it’s a powerful generator of memory and emotion.

“When you were a kid, bicycling was the first time you’d done anything like that away from your parents—you could ride to the next town, or through the river valley, and by riding you learned about life. My study showed that the connection to physically moving yourself and learning about the world is really evocative. You end up craving that again and again.”

You interviewed 28 diehard cyclists for your study—what else did they tell you?

“It wasn’t that long ago that we thought adults who rode bikes had to be impoverished or had lost their drivers’ licences or were Olympic racers or were just plain crazy. It’s fascinating to me that the people I interviewed said adults didn’t ride bikes, yet every one of them is an adult riding a bike. How did that shift come for them? I think it tells us that those boundaries are changing in a way we can attribute to healthier, older baby boomers—they don’t want to sit on the sidelines.”

“Their connection to their bicycles also reinforced a sense of connection to themselves, to others and to community. We understand where we live and with whom we are living because we look at potential mates or friends and if those people understand about cycling, then it’s easier for us to have a sense of connection. We like to hang out with people who are like us because it short-cuts things for us—we can assume that their world view is similar to ours.”

How should drivers view cyclists?

“Think of them as people who choose to ride in that moment. Legally they have as much right to the road as any automobile. Treat it as a slow-moving vehicle, like a tractor. You would go around a tractor, so you should go around a cyclist. I think we should try to treat each other with empathy. Imagine that cyclist or that driver is your mom, your teacher, your neighbor. We all make choices to move through the world in some way and the fact that an automobile driver has made one choice and I as a cyclist have made another, are not inherently bad choices.”

The City of Edmonton is creating more bike lanes. Why are bike lanes good for a community?

“Bike lanes contribute to making functional infrastructure for everyone on the road. They are a feasible way of moving a great amount of traffic by using spaces designated for each type: pedestrians, automobiles or cyclists. Yes, the speed has to be slower, but now the flow is continuous because the traffic can be closer. And, high speeds diminish the livability of a city. What are most people nostalgic for? They are nostalgic for that slow-moving lifestyle, when kids could go out and play on their street. High speeds don’t let kids ride bikes.”

How is cycling good for us?

“It’s physical activity, which means you can have that piece of cake or devilled egg or a second glass of wine. It’s also a stress-reliever; instead of sitting on a bus brooding about your co-worker, you can cycle home and work off that angst instead of dwelling on it.

“You’re also reducing your environmental footprint for everyone when you choose not to drive a car. It’s one less car on the road, one less parking spot taken up. Plus it’s cheaper for you—less insurance, no registration fee, no auto repairs. You can put that money into other stuff you want to consume—like organic vegetables or perogies or whatever.”

What do you love about biking?

“I love that I don’t have to rely on anybody to get around. I don’t have to wait for the train or the bus. I can move through my environment in a way that is really personal and embodied; I encounter my neighbours on a day-to-day basis and stop and chat with them. It’s satisfying. I bike several times a week—to university, to get beer and groceries, to concerts. Like many people, I learned to bike as a child and then stopped. Fortunately, when I turned 24 and moved to Edmonton, I fell in with a bunch of friends who all cycled to get around and it became a way of life for me. This lifestyle helps me make daily decisions about transportation, food, recreation and entertainment, including where I live (downtown) and how I choose to live. It sounds sentimental, but my way of life makes me very, very happy.”

Quick 5 questions with a member & national champ: Fatema Tajbhai

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2 Jun 2017 Cycling Australia

St Kilda Cycling Club member and 2017 paracycling (C5) time trial national champion, Fatema Tajbhai is a pretty amazing individual.


When she’s not out tearing up the mountainous country, or racing through regional Victoria, you can find her in hanging out in one of her local haunts sipping on a long black.

 

What’s your number one tip for bike riding? i.e. always carry a $5 note. 

I always carry an extra layer. It makes sitting around enjoying your post ride coffee a lot more enjoyable. It is especially important for me at this time of the year as Melbourne weather is so unpredictable.

Favourite post ride cafe and favourite coffee?

Woven in Yarraville is my favourite post ride coffee spot, and it’s always a long black with a bit of hot milk on the side.  As I’m nearing an end of a ride I look forward to it and sometimes it can be bit of a sprint to get there before they shut at 3 pm on the weekends.

How many bikes do you own and what’s your favourite?

Currently, I own 2 bikes.  A road bike and a single speed I use for commuting.  I love my road bike!  I can race on it, train on it and do social rides.  It’s an all-rounder!

If you could be anyone for a day, who would it be and why?

 

Daniel Andrews, Premier of Victoria. I would put cycling safety and cycling infrastructure at the top of my agenda and pass in some laws that are so necessary for cyclist’s safety.

 

Favourite hometown ride?

Anything with some climbs!  Can’t’ beat a good Mt Pleasant loop or a ride out to Kinglake or the Dandenongs.  If I’m short on time the Boulie (Kew Boulevard) is a good option and I love the views of Melbourne from there

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Cycling volunteers contribute more than 3.5 million hours annually to the sport, says British Cycling

To mark Volunteers’ Week 2017, some of Britain’s most successful cyclists have today praised the sport’s volunteers, after it was revealed that they collectively contribute an estimated 3.5 million hours to cycling per year.

There are currently more than 25,000 people registered in official British Cycling volunteer roles – a broad scope of vital positions across the sport including commissaires, event organisers, ride leaders, coaches and club welfare officers.

According to the UK Civil Society, regular volunteers contribute an average of 11.6 hours per month. This would mean that British Cycling’s registered volunteers give a total of 3,507,283 hours every year. The figure does not include the thousands of volunteers working in unofficial roles such as sign-on stewards and tea servers at British Cycling events, all of whom are invaluable to the ongoing success of the sport.

Britain’s most successful ever female Olympian, Laura Kenny, said: “Volunteers are the backbone of our sport and it is amazing that the time they contribute to cycling amounts to at least 3.5 million hours.

“Without them, we wouldn’t have opportunities to race and without those opportunities we wouldn’t be able to perform as well on the world stage. It could even be said that without them I wouldn’t have won my Olympic gold medals!”   

Olympic gold medallist and British Cycling’s policy adviser, Chris Boardman, said: “Volunteering in cycling isn’t just about providing practical and logistical support at the thousands of cycling events that take place each year; it’s also about emotional support and inspiration.

“Volunteers can make a big difference to people’s experiences of the sport and whether or not they choose to continue cycling. That’s why they’re so vital to the sport’s success and we want to thank each and every one of them.” 

Volunteers’ Week is an annual celebration of the contribution that millions of volunteers make across the UK. Over 21 million people volunteer in the UK at least once a year, and their contribution adds an estimated £23.9bn to the nation’s economy.

At a recreational level alone, the number of volunteer ride leaders supporting HSBC UK Breeze, HSBC UK Guided Rides and HSBC UK Ride Social is more than 3,200 and still growing. British Cycling offers free Ride Leadership Award Level training to all levels of cyclists in partnership with local authorities across the UK. To become a ride leader and help get more people cycling for fun in Britain, visit www.letsride.co.uk.

Giles Morgan, global head of sponsorship at HSBC, commented: “The sheer scale of volunteering that takes place across British Cycling events – the equivalent of 400 years’ worth of time given up every year – is absolutely phenomenal.

Our partnership with British Cycling is very much focused on grassroots cycling, and the hard work that volunteers put in really do keep the wheels moving on the cycling movement, helping those who are already taking part, and making those who are new joiners feel extremely welcome and safe.

She Rides leader profile: Alison Hugo

Launceston native and the newest coach to Cycling Australia’s She Rides program, Alison Hugo, tells us a little bit about how riding a bike has impacted her life in such a positive way, and why she wants to share this story with others.

 

How did you first get into riding?

 

My love for riding was fuelled by movies such as BMX Bandits and ET but some of my first memories of riding were heading off exploring with the neighbourhood kids. We would meet up after tea on those long Summer evenings and just ride. Probably the highlight of my riding was when at the age of nine I won a shiny yellow Dragster with all the trimmings in a local competition. The dragster was the prize to win and that prize was mine, I was the envy of the all my friends.  

 

Where ever I have lived and wherever I go there is usually a bike involved.  I am proud to say I don’t take myself or my riding too seriously. It is totally about the experience, not the outfit or the fancy bike you might have. It is about the ride and the journey.

 

How did you become first become a cycling coach?

 

I completed the Cycling Australia Skills Coach Instructor Course last year after it was recommended to me by some of the cycling community. In order to build a strong and vibrant cycling culture, it’s important to have a pool of enthusiastic qualified instructors and I was keen to be one of those.

 

What’s your background?

A year ago my husband and I decided to combine our love of riding and our love of Launceston by starting our own tourist business, On Your Bike Tours. We run a range of bike tours in and around Launceston

 

In terms of riding, I have always ridden a bike recreationally. I have ridden commuter bikes, mountain bikes and any sort of bike all my life.  I started riding a bike when I was 4 so in total that is 42 years of riding. I have embraced the opportunity to ride wherever I have lived or travelled.  This includes pedalling through the busy streets of Sydney when I was on a six month round trip with the family riding around Australia through to riding some remote wilderness locations in the wilds of Tassie.

 

Today you can find me hurtling down the fabulous new mountain bike tracks in Northern Tassie with my family, cruising to work as a commuter rider, or guiding an ‚On Your Bike Tour’ through the delightful city of Launceston.

 

Why is Cycling Australia’s She Rides program important to you?

 

I have always loved riding and the opportunities, experiences and feelings that riding provides. It’s empowering, keeps me fit and my bike can take me anywhere and show me new things. Plus it’s super efficient and fun. I am really keen for others to experience this.

 

Launceston has improved its bike infrastructure immensely over the past 2 years including better cycle lanes, cycle ways and local mountain bike tracks. This has opened the door for everyone to jump on their bikes and get rolling. For some women, it’s just a matter of brushing up on old skills or learning a few new ones to gain the confidence to use this great infrastructure.

 

How do you aim to get more women riding locally?

 

I see the She Ride Program as a pathway to connecting women to the type of riding they want to be part of, whether that is social, fitness, competitive, recreational or commuting reasons. Once they gain their confidence then it will be just a matter of connecting them to the right groups and the right situations for their skill level and interest.

 

Since we started our bike business a year ago it has opened a whole range of opportunities to use the On Your Bike tour bikes for other things other than for the tours. This has included being part of a program to teach recent migrants, predominantly women, how to ride. My book club friends joined the local Tweed Ride as part of the Junction Arts Festival last year for a dress up and ride experience through the streets of Launceston. We also support new riders to come and join the local Tamar Bike Users Group once a month of their social rides.

 

What is it that you love about riding?

 

There are many things I love about riding. One of the main ones is the feeling of liberation that comes with riding. The independence and the freedom of being in charge of the how and where you go.  I also love the stories associated with riding and how through the centuries and decades there are intriguing tales that reflect a time and a place in history. Plus I love how cycling influenced women’s fashion and increased their independence.

JLT Condor and Drops take Tour Series titles

JLT Condor were crowned Tour Series champion for the second successive year, defending their title to take their fourth Tour Series crown under the guidance of John Herety.

Earlier Rebecca Durrell had crowned a fantastic Matrix Fitness Grand Prix Series for herself and her Drops team, taking the individual win in Stevenage to seal the both the team’s and rider’s titles after three weeks of competition.

Swift with second win

Madison Genesis’ Connor Swift had escaped in the final handful of laps, as his Madison Genesis team set him up perfectly for the win, allowing him to go clear and then hold off the chasing peloton for the honours on the night. Swift also secured the Brother Fastest Lap as he powered to victory.

Once again though it was JLT Condor riders at the forefront, with Graham Briggs and double-round winner Brenton Jones following Von Hoff home for third and fourth.

Madison Genesis though were the round 10 winners, pipping JLT Condor for the final win of 2017 and reducing their deficit in the overall standings to two-points.

Behind BIKE Channel Canyon pipped ONE Pro Cycling by just one-point to the third spot, with Team Raleigh GAC in fifth, ahead of Metaltek Kuota and Morvelo Basso.

Sebastian Mora finished The Tour Series with a 30-point margin over James Lowsely-Williams in the Wiggle Points Jersey standings, with Jones of JLT Condor a further four points back.

Drops crowned Matrix Fitness Grand Prix Series champions

Durrell outsprinted teammate Lucy Shaw and Olympic Champion Katie Archibald at the end of the 32-lap race around the Old Town in Stevenage, taking the Brother Fastest Lap along the way.

The race had stayed together throughout despite repeated attacks with the final round coming down to a 33-rider bunch sprint.

Durrell powered clear, taking her first ever series victory to round out a memorable campaign, that saw her ride in all eight events, helping Drops to their first ever Matrix Fitness Grand Prix Series title.

I’m really, really chuffed. The pressure was always going to be on for the team in the last round, even if it’s just from within ourselves,” said Durrell speaking afterwards.

„I knew I’d already won the individual overall before the start of tonight’s race but I’d deliberately not said anything about that as that would have been even more pressure. So now we’re just all relieved.

„Last year didn’t finish as we’d hoped as we missed out on the team win in just the last few hundred yards.

„We did talk about that at bit in preparing for this race and we were all very honest in recognising mistakes we made and that perhaps last year we went into the race a bit too confident and so perhaps took some unnecessarily risks. So this year we thought we’d ease it back a little bit, play a bit of a safe game but still be up there at the front of the race, getting in the mix of things. But, it worked!”

Highlights of the Stevenage round of The Tour Series will be shown on ITV4 at 10pm on Tuesday 30 May and available on demand via the ITV Hub. The action will also be shown on Eurosport.

JLT Condor and Drops take Tour Series titles

JLT Condor were crowned Tour Series champion for the second successive year, defending their title to take their fourth Tour Series crown under the guidance of John Herety.

Earlier Rebecca Durrell had crowned a fantastic Matrix Fitness Grand Prix Series for herself and her Drops team, taking the individual win in Stevenage to seal the both the team’s and rider’s titles after three weeks of competition.

Swift with second win

Madison Genesis’ Connor Swift had escaped in the final handful of laps, as his Madison Genesis team set him up perfectly for the win, allowing him to go clear and then hold off the chasing peloton for the honours on the night. Swift also secured the Brother Fastest Lap as he powered to victory.

Once again though it was JLT Condor riders at the forefront, with Graham Briggs and double-round winner Brenton Jones following Von Hoff home for third and fourth.

Madison Genesis though were the round 10 winners, pipping JLT Condor for the final win of 2017 and reducing their deficit in the overall standings to two-points.

Behind BIKE Channel Canyon pipped ONE Pro Cycling by just one-point to the third spot, with Team Raleigh GAC in fifth, ahead of Metaltek Kuota and Morvelo Basso.

Sebastian Mora finished The Tour Series with a 30-point margin over James Lowsely-Williams in the Wiggle Points Jersey standings, with Jones of JLT Condor a further four points back.

Drops crowned Matrix Fitness Grand Prix Series champions

Durrell outsprinted teammate Lucy Shaw and Olympic Champion Katie Archibald at the end of the 32-lap race around the Old Town in Stevenage, taking the Brother Fastest Lap along the way.

The race had stayed together throughout despite repeated attacks with the final round coming down to a 33-rider bunch sprint.

Durrell powered clear, taking her first ever series victory to round out a memorable campaign, that saw her ride in all eight events, helping Drops to their first ever Matrix Fitness Grand Prix Series title.

I’m really, really chuffed. The pressure was always going to be on for the team in the last round, even if it’s just from within ourselves,” said Durrell speaking afterwards.

„I knew I’d already won the individual overall before the start of tonight’s race but I’d deliberately not said anything about that as that would have been even more pressure. So now we’re just all relieved.

„Last year didn’t finish as we’d hoped as we missed out on the team win in just the last few hundred yards.

„We did talk about that at bit in preparing for this race and we were all very honest in recognising mistakes we made and that perhaps last year we went into the race a bit too confident and so perhaps took some unnecessarily risks. So this year we thought we’d ease it back a little bit, play a bit of a safe game but still be up there at the front of the race, getting in the mix of things. But, it worked!”

Highlights of the Stevenage round of The Tour Series will be shown on ITV4 at 10pm on Tuesday 30 May and available on demand via the ITV Hub. The action will also be shown on Eurosport.

JLT Condor and Drops take Tour Series titles

JLT Condor were crowned Tour Series champion for the second successive year, defending their title to take their fourth Tour Series crown under the guidance of John Herety.

Earlier Rebecca Durrell had crowned a fantastic Matrix Fitness Grand Prix Series for herself and her Drops team, taking the individual win in Stevenage to seal the both the team’s and rider’s titles after three weeks of competition.

Swift with second win

Madison Genesis’ Connor Swift had escaped in the final handful of laps, as his Madison Genesis team set him up perfectly for the win, allowing him to go clear and then hold off the chasing peloton for the honours on the night. Swift also secured the Brother Fastest Lap as he powered to victory.

Once again though it was JLT Condor riders at the forefront, with Graham Briggs and double-round winner Brenton Jones following Von Hoff home for third and fourth.

Madison Genesis though were the round 10 winners, pipping JLT Condor for the final win of 2017 and reducing their deficit in the overall standings to two-points.

Behind BIKE Channel Canyon pipped ONE Pro Cycling by just one-point to the third spot, with Team Raleigh GAC in fifth, ahead of Metaltek Kuota and Morvelo Basso.

Sebastian Mora finished The Tour Series with a 30-point margin over James Lowsely-Williams in the Wiggle Points Jersey standings, with Jones of JLT Condor a further four points back.

Drops crowned Matrix Fitness Grand Prix Series champions

Durrell outsprinted teammate Lucy Shaw and Olympic Champion Katie Archibald at the end of the 32-lap race around the Old Town in Stevenage, taking the Brother Fastest Lap along the way.

The race had stayed together throughout despite repeated attacks with the final round coming down to a 33-rider bunch sprint.

Durrell powered clear, taking her first ever series victory to round out a memorable campaign, that saw her ride in all eight events, helping Drops to their first ever Matrix Fitness Grand Prix Series title.

I’m really, really chuffed. The pressure was always going to be on for the team in the last round, even if it’s just from within ourselves,” said Durrell speaking afterwards.

„I knew I’d already won the individual overall before the start of tonight’s race but I’d deliberately not said anything about that as that would have been even more pressure. So now we’re just all relieved.

„Last year didn’t finish as we’d hoped as we missed out on the team win in just the last few hundred yards.

„We did talk about that at bit in preparing for this race and we were all very honest in recognising mistakes we made and that perhaps last year we went into the race a bit too confident and so perhaps took some unnecessarily risks. So this year we thought we’d ease it back a little bit, play a bit of a safe game but still be up there at the front of the race, getting in the mix of things. But, it worked!”

Highlights of the Stevenage round of The Tour Series will be shown on ITV4 at 10pm on Tuesday 30 May and available on demand via the ITV Hub. The action will also be shown on Eurosport.