GameStop to shutter up to 225 stores

By Beki Winchel and Kevin Allen | Posted: March 29, 2017

It’s not just clothing retailers: GameStop—the company that brought video game buy-back mainstream—is also falling upon hard times.

It recently announced that it will close 150 to 225 of its 7,500 stores following a major drop in sales.

The announcement was buried in a short paragraph in the company’s news release, entitled: “ GameStop Reports Sales and Earnings for Fiscal 2016 and Provides 2017Outlook”:

In 2017, the Company anticipates that it will open approximately 35 new Collectibles stores globally, and approximately 65 new Technology Brand stores. The Company also anticipates that it will close between 2% to 3% of its global store footprint.

The company reported a nearly 30 percent drop in hardware sales and close to 20 percent drop in software sales in the previous quarter, according to its most recent earnings statement. Overall, sales fell nearly 14 percent.

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In a jargon-laden statement containing terms such as “maximizing free cash flow” and “rationalizing our global store portfolio,” GameStop’s chief executive said the company is pivoting to focus on non-gaming sales:

Paul Raines, chief executive officer, stated, “GameStop’s transformation continued to take hold in 2016, as our non-gaming businesses drove gross margin expansion and significantly contributed to our profits. Meanwhile, the video game category was weak, particularly in the back half of 2016, as the console cycle ages. Looking at 2017, Technology Brands and Collectibles are expected to generate another year of strong growth, and new hardware innovation in the video game category looks promising. As we continue our transformation plan, we will also be focused on managing SG&A spend, rationalizing our global store portfolio, and maximizing free cash flow generation to drive shareholder value.”

The company faces increased threats from online retailers and brick-and-mortar competition.

The closures caused some reporters to wonder whether this signifies the end of brick-and-mortar video game stores. However, The Verge’s Andrew Liptak reported that the focus on collectibles seems to be a wise business and marketing move:

Despite … those losses, there were some bright points, and GameStop appears to be pivoting to adjust. The company saw its sales rise by 27.8 percent when it came to collectibles, particularly with pokémon-related toys and apparel.

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10 punctuation tips for every writer

Writers can avoid most punctuation errors by mastering the following conventions:

1. Introductory words, phrases and clauses are followed by a comma.

Incorrect: Moreover students are expected to read at least one English classic every six weeks.
Correct: Moreover, students are expected to read at least one English classic every six weeks.

Moreover is an introductory word and should be followed by a comma.

Incorrect: To become fluent readers students must read outside school hours.
Correct: To become fluent readers, students must read outside school hours.

“To become fluent readers” is an introductory infinitive phrase and should be followed by a comma.

Incorrect: If you want to write well you must be prepared to practice the craft.
Correct: If you want to write well, you must be prepared to practice the craft.

“If you want to write well” is an introductory clause and should be followed by a comma.

2. Nonessential information is set off with commas.

Incorrect: Joseph Conrad who was born in Poland began to learn English in his twenties.
Correct: Joseph Conrad, who was born in Poland, began to learn English in his twenties.

“Who was born in Poland” is a clause that provides nonessential information and should be set off by commas.

3. Essential information does not require commas.

Incorrect: The boys, who vandalized the public gardens, are in police custody.
Correct: The boys who vandalized the public gardens are in police custody.

“Who vandalized the public gardens” is essential information because it identifies which boys are meant. It should not be set off by commas.

[RELATED Attend the PR and Media Relations Summit in NYC and find out what it takes to produce better brand journalism.]

4. A comma is placed before a coordinate conjunction that joins two independent clauses.

Incorrect: The cougar moved quickly but the tourist reached the safety of the cabin.
Correct: The cougar moved quickly, but the tourist reached the safety of the cabin.

The clauses joined by the conjunction but could stand alone as complete sentences: “The cougar moved quickly” and “The tourist reached the safety of the cabin.” A comma is not needed with a compound verb joined by a coordinate conjunction: “The tourist saw the cougar and ran to the cabin.”

5. A comma is not strong enough to join two main clauses (comma splice).

Incorrect: Circumstances required the children to live in a homeless shelter, nevertheless they kept up with their studies.
Correct: Circumstances required the children to live in a homeless shelter; nevertheless, they kept up with their studies.

Also correct: Circumstances required the children to live in a homeless shelter. Nevertheless, they kept up with their studies.

A comma splice results when two independent clauses are joined by a comma. The main clauses here are “Circumstances required the children to live in a homeless shelter” and “nevertheless, they kept up with their studies.”

The word nevertheless is a conjunctive adverb. Its function is to provide a transition between two thoughts, but it is not a joining word like and or but. A comma splice can be avoided by placing a semicolon after the first clause or by ending the first clause with a period or other end stop and starting a new sentence with a capital letter.

6. A comma is not needed before a noun clause in ordinary narration.

Incorrect: The spelunkers found, that the caves were closed to protect the bats.
Correct: The spelunkers found that the caves were closed to protect the bats.

The noun clause is “the caves were closed to protect the bats.” The clause functions as the direct object of the verb in the main clause, found.

7. A comma is needed before a direct quotation.

Incorrect: The wizard said “Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.”
Correct: The wizard said, “Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.”

8. Colons should be used after a complete sentence to introduce a word, phrase, clause, list or quotation.

Incorrect: Her favorite flowers are: daffodils, roses and pansies.
Correct: She has three favorite flowers: daffodils, roses and pansies.

“Her favorite flowers are” is a sentence fragment. A complete sentence should precede a colon that introduces a thought that expands on the meaning of the sentence that precedes it.

9. Main clauses that are not part of a compound or complex sentence require an end stop. When a period or other end stop is omitted, the result is a “run-on sentence.”

Incorrect: The rushing waves capsized the boat indifferent gulls wheeled overhead.
Correct: The rushing waves capsized the boat. Indifferent gulls wheeled overhead.

The simplest way to correct a run-on sentence is to put a period at the end of the first clause and capitalize the first word of the next one.

10. Multiple exclamation points don’t belong in mature writing.

Incorrect: Before my astonished eyes, the house sank into the tarn!!!!
Correct: Before my astonished eyes, the house sank into the tarn!

On the rare occasions that an exclamation mark is wanted in formal writing, one is sufficient.

Bonus: Quotation marks should not be used merely for emphasis.

Incorrect: Our staff is required to take three “safety” courses every year.
Correct: Our staff is required to take three safety courses every year.

In most contexts, placing quotation marks around a word suggests that the word is being used with a meaning other than the obvious one. Writers who enclose words in quotation marks merely for emphasis risk annoying their readers. No one likes to waste time trying to discern a hidden meaning where there is none.

A version of this article originally appeared on Daily Writing Tips.

This article first ran on Ragan.com in March 2016.

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CEO’s video series boosts morale, engagement

Down in a basement at a Hamilton Health Sciences hospital, a long-term employee worked in a lab just across the hall from the Medical Device Reprocessing Department.

But she had never learned about what happened behind the doors of the neighboring department until CEO Rob MacIsaac filmed a video there.

„I’ve worked here for 13 years, and before I saw that I had no idea what they did beyond those doors,” she told digital communications lead Scott Levely.

Her reaction illustrates why the video series „Teach Rob Your Job” has been popular with executives, communicators and employees alike at the seven-hospital group serving south-central Ontario.

Communications records video as the top dog learns about the daily jobs of individual specialists and others. This allows staffers find out about each others’ work and helps create dual-purpose content—in addition to being shared internally, it’s also placed on an outward-facing platform of Vimeo.

„It’s turned into a bit of a cross-hospital and cross-discipline education tool so people better understand what others in the hospital are doing,” Levely says.

In one recent video, MacIsaac learned about cardiac surgery. In another, he explored transfusion medicine. In the most recent video, he delved into what volunteers were up to at the hospital group.

[embedded content]

Rob learns about our volunteers at HHS from Hamilton Health Sciences on Vimeo.

The video series was born of an awareness shared by many organizations, particularly ones that have expanded or merged. Often there is a gap between execs and frontline staff members, and geographically isolated organizations especially experience that phenomenon.

[RELATED: Join us in Arizona, and learn how to build and maintain a great company culture through growth and change.]

Countering the ‚watered-down brand’

Hamilton Health Sciences has merged with several hospital groups over the years, Levely says, and „with that amalgamation comes a bit of a watered-down brand or a lack of identity.” Workers tend to identify with their individual hospital („I work for Juravinski„) rather than the brand.

MacIsaac sought to counter that impression as the greater organization emphasized that all its hospitals provide the same level of care and patient experience. The videos are helping close feelings of disconnection to the greater brand, Levely says.

„It’s creating a stronger brand, that consistent experience . . . regardless of where you’re located in the city,” he says.

Hamilton Health Sciences is a significant presence in Ontario. It reportedly boasts the province’s largest hospital workforce, with more than 15,000 staff, physicians and volunteers. The group is also ranked as one of Canada’s top five research hospitals, with more than 2,000 specialists conducting research in over 1,500 centers across 86 countries worldwide, Levely says.

Hospitals are filled with inspiring stories, and MacIsaac finds them in a number of videos. One is titled, „Rob visits our tiniest patients in the NICU,” and takes the boss into a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Rather than deliver a corporate message, he’s there to learn.

„This is Erin. She was born at 32 weeks, so pretty premature,” a nurse tells MacIsaac.

[embedded content]

Rob visits our tiniest patients in the NICU from Hamilton Health Sciences on Vimeo.

Each video ends with a moment of reflection from MacIsaac. In the video of the premature infants, he says the unit is „trying to, as much as possible, create those special moments that every parent wants to have with their child. I think it NICU is something we can all be really proud of at Hamilton Health Sciences.”

Another video, titled, „Rob Learns About Occupational Therapy,” offers the CEO a chance to salute the specialists who provide rehabilitation therapy for patients who use wheelchairs or are otherwise in need of care.

[embedded content]

Rob Learns About Occupational Therapy from Hamilton Health Sciences on Vimeo.

He also learns the role of clinical managers and pays a visit to prosthetics.

[embedded content]

Rob visits Prosthetics & Orthotics at Chedoke from Hamilton Health Sciences on Vimeo.

A culture of pride

In the OT video, MacIsaac says one big takeaway „is how extensively occupational therapists are involved in all of our patient populations from the smallest baby through to folks . . . who are at the very other end of their lives. They play such a key role here at Hamilton Health Sciences.”

Levely says the videos help build a culture of pride and heighten the perception that the chief executive is accessible. Because of the series, he can walk into any hospital and be recognized by employees.

„He likes it because it breaks down the barriers that exist between the front lines and the CEO,” he says. „People watch these videos and they feel like they know him a little bit. It’s a lot easier to approach the guy and say hi when you pass him in the hallway because you know who he is.”

There is no screening process for staffers who’d like a turn as a video star. Levely says anyone can request that MacIsaac drop by for an interview. By not hand-picking those who participate, it builds a sense of genuineness in the communications.

Says Levely, „It’s the way that we provide care to our community, and the experience our community has when they’re interacting with us.”

@byworking

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Show off your innovative media relations strategy

Your secret is out: You’re a brand architect who knows how to tell and sell a story.

Now, we’d like all the details. Tell us how you mastered the delicate balance of powerful storytelling, relationship building, reputation management and more to create an impressive media relations strategy across multiple channels. How did you analyze media trends to generate more clicks, more shares and more coverage?

The 2017 Media Relations Awards are here to celebrate your ability to remain calm in the face of a crisis, your willingness to think beyond the standard press release and your dedication to sharable storytelling. Gain recognition for the accomplishments that made a difference for your customers, your clients or your team.

This year’s 20 categories, including Brand Messaging or Position, Integrated Marketing Communications, Product or Service Launch, Press Event or Media Tour, and Social Media Campaign will allow you to share your expertise in a specific discipline. Three new categories, Crisis or Reputation Management, Native Advertising, and Social Influencer Program will celebrate your most innovative strategies and campaigns.

Don’t feel confined to one category; we encourage you to submit any campaign to as many categories as you’d like. Of course, don’t forget the Grand Prize category, which will validate you as a true expert.

Want to see what it takes to be named a winner? Check out the 2016 Media Relations Special Edition

See a full list of categories and eligibility requirements, and read how to enter below.

Eligibility Requirements

These awards are open to in-house, agency and independent communication practitioners in the private, corporate, nonprofit and government sectors. Enter your work, the work of your organization or submit entries on behalf of your client.

Companies from around the world are welcome to enter as long as the entry is submitted in English.

This year’s program is open to any work executed between Jan, 1, 2016, and Feb. 15, 2017, inclusive.

Contact Justine Figueroa to find the perfect category for your campaign or project. You can reach her at 312-960-4304 or justinef@ragan.com

Deadlines/Entry Fees

Early Bird Deadline: March 15, 2017
(Save $50 per entry!)

Final Extended Deadline: May 10, 2017

The fee for this program is $295 per entry. (Entry fee for either Grand Prize category is $395.)

Early bird submissions must be received by 11:59 p.m. Central time on March 15, 2017 to receive the $50 discount.

A late fee of $100 per entry will added to all entries after 11:59 p.m. Central time, April 12, 2017.

Please note: Entry fees are non-refundable.

W-9 Form / Tax ID Number Request

Prizes

Each category winner will receive:

  • A featured write-up in a Special Edition of Ragan.com
  • An elegant trophy
  • One complimentary registration to any Ragan event, webcast, or conference within 12 months of winning

The winners of the Grand Prize categories also will receive a one-year membership to Ragan Training —a premium online training library featuring hundreds of hours of the very best content from Ragan events. Find out more about the site here: https://ragantraining.com/

[Back to the Top]

  • Categories

  • Brand Messaging or Positioning

    We want to know how you propelled your organization’s reputation forward. How did you set your brand apart from its competitors and create buzz? Did you see an increased response from media outlets? Tell us about the intricacies for your brand campaign and how you got your story out to the world.

  • Cause Advocacy Campaign

    Tell us how you’re contributing to causes that matter and how you’re raising the public profile of issues you care about. Give us the details of your campaign strategy. Did you overcome a major challenge while trying to raise awareness? What tools did you use to get past it? Share your campaign and results.

  • Crowdsourcing Campaign

    Your campaign took a customer-first approach. How did your media relations campaign prove that the opinions of your audience were most important? How did you cultivate brand ambassadors from your loyal customer base? Tell us how their voices brought attention to your brand and boosted its reputation.

  • New! Crisis or Reputation Management

    You’re the Olivia Pope of crisis communications. You remained cool-headed under pressure and de-escalated a chaotic situation. How did you mitigate a potential media disaster to keep your organization’s reputation in good standing with the public? Tell us about the crisis and how you bounced back using journalists’ help.

  • Executive Visibility

    Your high-level executives are the face of your brand. How do you train them to personify and amplify your message? Which senior executives are you putting out there? We’re looking for campaigns that don’t merely “humanize” top-tier bosses. We want to see campaigns that bring to life unforgettable, genuine personalities—and tie them to the organization’s goals.

  • Global Media Relations

    Your message reached far and wide, and we want to know how you gained the momentum to take your brand international. How does your message cross geographical boundaries? How do you make your message relevant and interesting where you live and useful to those across the oceans? What was your story? Where did it travel?

  • Governmental or Public Affairs Media Relations

    How and why did you collaborate with journalists to meet governmental or public affairs goals? How did your relationship help you engage with your local community? Share how you developed this relationship and how it benefitted your organization. How did you educate the public about your group or its policy?

  • Innovation in Media Relations

    Are you tired of taking the same ineffective, repetitive route when it comes to your organization’s media relations strategy? How did you execute your vision for creating a new process, concept or slogan? What results did your idea bring that changed the way journalists or members of the public think about you or your product, service or cause? Show us.

  • Integrated Marketing Communications

    How did you put together a well-coordinated mix of promotional messages that reinforced your brand awareness to the media? Did you use content marketing and storytelling in your media-relations blitz? What were the results?

  • Media Relations Video

    How did your team or company master the art of video to reach a mass audience? How do you use images and real people to tell an array of stories? Did you keep them short and simple, or did you create long-form videos? Did your videos inspire action or use humor to educate? Show us, and tell us the story behind what’s on the screen.

  • New! Native Advertising

    Did you land coverage in a national publication that helped sell your product or services? How did you collaborate with an editorial team to create an under-the-radar advertorial? Tell us what publications you sought out and why you think your audiences are similar. Share the native ad and metrics to prove that it built brand awareness.

  • Product or Service Launch

    Tell us how your PR department or client impressed journalists with the launch of a product or service. Describe the tactics and strategy, and brag about how sweet the outcome proved to be.

  • Thought Leadership Campaign

    Your organization is staffed by experts with a wealth of industry knowledge. How did you make sure customers and competitors alike knew this? Did you place an op-ed in a local newspaper? Did a team member author a piece for a notable trade publication? Tell us how you used brand storytelling to prove your talent in a particular field and put forth your organization as an industry thought leader.

  • Pitch

    The key components of an impressive pitch are imagination, great writing and outstanding visuals. Did you write an email pitch with a perfect subject line, followed up with a narrative story hook so dramatic, yet concise, that journalists, bloggers and influencers fell over themselves trying to find out more? Did your online press release set a record for click-throughs and average time on your website? Did your multimedia press release get shared hundreds of times on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn? Brag about it.

  • Press Event or Media Tour

    Not only did you handle the chaos of a producing a live event, you thrived under the pressure and created an unforgettable experience. Tell us how you selected your guest list, promoted your event across multiple channels and encouraged social media engagement. Give us the inside story on how you pulled it all together, resulting in outstanding media coverage.

  • Stunt or Special Event

    How did your publicity stunt or special event directly or indirectly generate interest from journalists for your client or highlight your message? What ideas inspired its creation? What led to its success? How did you measure results?

  • Use of a Celebrity or Personality

    Tell us why you thought a celebrity or personality would be the best spokesperson for your brand. Did you hire a local figure, an A-lister or someone in between? How did media outlets respond? How does your product or service reinforce the credibility of your celebrity and vice versa? How did you turn that match into results?

  • New! Social Influencer Program

    The right social influencer can have as much power as a well-known media outlet. Tell us how you scouted the perfect group of influential social media stars to raise your brand’s profile among a certain demographic. Did you reach out to mommy bloggers? Beauty gurus? Instagram-famous Chihuahuas? What metrics determined the ideal influencer? How did you entice them into becoming brand loyalists and public ambassadors? What were the results?

  • Social Media Campaign

    We want to see evidence that you built a publicity campaign aimed at reporters, influencers and bloggers on your social media channel(s). Explain why you chose your channels, what you hoped to do, the results, lessons learned and the effect on your organization internally. We’re interested in hearing the whole story.

  • Grand Prize: Media Relations Campaign of the Year

    We’re seeking well-rounded and robust campaigns that delivered huge success. Share with us everything you did to reach the stars. Winners will be chosen in each of these categories:

    • Over $50,000
    • Under $50,000
    • Under $10,000

[Back to the Top]

How To Enter

On the entry form, be sure to include a thorough synopsis explaining the purpose and scope of your project. We ask that the synopsis be at least 1,000 words (max: 1,250 words) and include the following sub-headings (when applicable):

  • Goals
  • Strategy and tactics
  • Execution
  • Evaluation: success, results or ROI

Be sure to follow the guidelines laid out in the category descriptions, as the judges will look for those elements when they select the winners.

You will be able to upload up to five additional documents to your submission. We encourage you to include press releases, design concepts, videos, analytics, testimonials and anything else you feel will give us a better sense of your project. Proprietary or internal information can also be attached and will not be shared with the public.

Supporting documents that can’t be uploaded to the system should be mailed to:

Justine Figueroa
Ragan Communications
316 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 400
Chicago, IL 60601

Enter Online

[Back to the Top]

FAQs

Are the awards open to organizations outside the United States?

Yes. Entries may be submitted by organization from around the world. The only requirement is that entries be submitted in English.

May an organization or nominator enter more than one entry?

Yes. Enter as many categories as you like. One story, video, design, etc. may also be entered in multiple categories if it meets the criteria. Each entry and each category will require a separate entry fee.

Will you return my entry materials?

No.

Who judges the entries?

Our judges include the editorial staff of Ragan.com, PR Daily.com, and Health Care Communication News.

When and where will the winners be announced?

We try to announce a list of finalists six to eight weeks after the close of the program. The announcement of the winners comes about three to four weeks after the announcement of the finalists. Each of these announcements will be made with a headline on our website, in our daily email newsletter, and on our social media platforms. Emails will be sent to all the entrants to notify them of these announcements.

Will there be an awards luncheon or live ceremony?

There is no live event associated with this program.

[Back to the Top]

Additional Questions

If you have any questions about the program or problems submitting your entry, please call Justine Figueroa at 312-960-4304 or email her at justinef@ragan.com.

Sponsorship Opportunities

If you are interested in sponsoring one of Ragan Communications’ award programs, please contact Kristin Farmer at 312-960-4405 or email her at kristinf@ragan.com.

[Back to the Top]

Enter Online

State-Administered Indigent Defense Systems, 2013

Suzanne M. Strong, Ph.D., Bureau of Justice Statistics

November 16, 2016    NCJ 250249

Describes the methods for providing representation in criminal defense and civil, juvenile, and appeals cases in 28 states and the District of Columbia. The report details various aspects of indigent defense delivery systems by jurisdiction, such as type of litigating attorneys, cases closed, caseload standards and guidelines, funding sources, fees for representation, how indigence is determined, role of advisory boards or commission, and standards for assigned or appointed counsel. Data are from the 2013 National Survey of Indigent Defense Systems, the first census of all methods of providing indigent defense services in the United States.

Highlights:

  • „„Of the 28 states and the District of Columbia that had state-administered indigent defense systems in 2013–
    Twenty-seven states and the District of Columbia had either governmental or nongovernmental public defenders providing representation for indigent clients.
    Eight states and the District of Columbia required indigent clients to pay both an application fee to receive representation and recoupment for legal services provided.
    In nine states the governor appointed the chief executives of the indigent defense delivery system.
    Six states reported fewer than 10 full-time equivalent investigators on staff for public defender offices.
  • „„Between 2007 and 2013, 16 of the 22 states with state-administered public defender offices increased the number of full-time equivalent litigating attorneys.
  • „„„In 2013, state-administered systems closed an estimated 2,672,760 criminal, appellate, civil, and juvenile cases.

Summary (PDF 244K)
PDF (958K)
ASCII file (31K)
Comma-delimited format (CSV) (Zip format 31K)

Help for using BJS products

About the Source Data
National Survey Of Indigent Defense Systems (NSIDS), 2013

To cite this product, use the following link:
http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&iid=5826

View All Publications and Products

State-Administered Indigent Defense Systems, 2013

Suzanne M. Strong, Ph.D., Bureau of Justice Statistics

November 16, 2016    NCJ 250249

Describes the methods for providing representation in criminal defense and civil, juvenile, and appeals cases in 28 states and the District of Columbia. The report details various aspects of indigent defense delivery systems by jurisdiction, such as type of litigating attorneys, cases closed, caseload standards and guidelines, funding sources, fees for representation, how indigence is determined, role of advisory boards or commission, and standards for assigned or appointed counsel. Data are from the 2013 National Survey of Indigent Defense Systems, the first census of all methods of providing indigent defense services in the United States.

Highlights:

  • „„Of the 28 states and the District of Columbia that had state-administered indigent defense systems in 2013–
    Twenty-seven states and the District of Columbia had either governmental or nongovernmental public defenders providing representation for indigent clients.
    Eight states and the District of Columbia required indigent clients to pay both an application fee to receive representation and recoupment for legal services provided.
    In nine states the governor appointed the chief executives of the indigent defense delivery system.
    Six states reported fewer than 10 full-time equivalent investigators on staff for public defender offices.
  • „„Between 2007 and 2013, 16 of the 22 states with state-administered public defender offices increased the number of full-time equivalent litigating attorneys.
  • „„„In 2013, state-administered systems closed an estimated 2,672,760 criminal, appellate, civil, and juvenile cases.

Summary (PDF 244K)
PDF (958K)
ASCII file (31K)
Comma-delimited format (CSV) (Zip format 31K)

Help for using BJS products

About the Source Data
National Survey Of Indigent Defense Systems (NSIDS), 2013

To cite this product, use the following link:
http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&iid=5826

View All Publications and Products

LLNL Reinventing Metal 3D Printing with Direct Metal Writing Process

LLNL Reinventing Metal 3D Printing with Direct Metal Writing Process

Article ID: 672115

Released: 30-Mar-2017 6:05 AM EDT

Source Newsroom: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

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    • Share


    • Unlike other metal 3D printing techniques that use lasers to fuse metal powder, the Direct Metal Writing approach incorporates an ingot that is heated until it reaches a semi-solid state before it’s forced through a nozzle. As it cools, the material hardens to form a 3D metal structure.

    • LLNL staff scientist Luke Thornley helped engineer the semisolid metal, a bismuth-tin mixture, that can be extruded through the nozzle of a specially-designed 3D printer

    Newswise — Metal 3D printing has enormous potential to revolutionize modern manufacturing. However, the most popular metal printing processes, which use lasers to fuse together fine metal powder, have their limitations. Parts produced using Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and other powder-based metal techniques often end up with gaps or defects caused by a variety of factors.

    To overcome those drawbacks, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers, along with collaborators at Worchester Polytechnic Institute, are taking a wholly new approach to metal 3D printing with a process they’re calling Direct Metal Writing, in which semisolid metal is directly extruded from a nozzle. The metal is engineered to be a shear thinning material, which means it acts like a solid when standing still, but flows like a liquid when a force is applied. The results of the ongoing three-year study were published in Applied Physics Letters in February.

    “We’re in new territory,” said lead author Wen Chen, an LLNL materials scientist. “We’ve advanced a new metal additive manufacturing technique that people aren’t aware of yet. I think a lot of people will be interested in continuing this work and expanding it into other alloys.”

    Instead of starting with metal powder, the Direct Metal Writing technique uses an ingot that is heated until it reaches a semi-solid state—solid metal particles are surrounded by a liquid metal resulting in a paste-like behavior— then it’s forced through a nozzle. The material is shear thinning because, when it’s at rest, the solid metal particles clump up and cause the structure to be solid. As soon at the material moves, or is in shear, the solid particles break up and the system acts like the liquid matrix. It hardens as it cools, so there’s less incorporated oxide and less residual stress in the part, the researchers explained.

    While encouraged by their success in printing test pieces, the researchers cautioned the method is still in its early stages and will need more work to achieve higher resolution parts with more industry-friendly metals, such as aluminum and titanium. In the paper, the team produced parts using a bismuth-tin mixture, which has a low melting point of less than 300 degrees Celsius. The process took numerous iterations to get right, as researchers ran into the problem of dendrites—fingers of solid metal that would get stuck in the nozzle.

    “The main issue was getting very tight control over the flow,” said LLNL engineer Andy Pascall. “You need precise control of the temperature. How you stir it, how fast you stir it, all makes a difference. If you can get the flow properties right, then you really have something. What we’ve done is really understand the way the material is flowing through the nozzle. Now we’ve gotten such good control that we can print self-supporting structures. That’s never been done before.”

    The researchers said the latest study will provide accurate operating conditions for printing with metal directly from a nozzle. They’re already moving onto aluminum alloys, a metal that would be more attractive to industries such as aerospace and transportation, but will present challenges because of its higher melting point.

    “Being able to print parts out of metal in this way is potentially important,” said staff scientist Luke Thornley, who worked on engineering the material. “So much of the work that goes into validation and analyzing for defects would be eliminated. We can use less material to make parts, meaning lighter parts, which would be big for aerospace.”

    The project is funded by the Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) program. Other LLNL researchers included in the study were Hannah Coe, Sam Tonneslan, John Vericella, Cheng Zhu, Eric Duoss, Ryan Hunt, Josh Kuntz and Chris Spadaccini.

    Founded in 1952, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (www.llnl.gov) provides solutions to our nation’s most important national security challenges through innovative science, engineering and technology. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is managed by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration.
     
    -END-

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    Navigation, Imaging and Positioning Solutions Market Value Chain, Dynamics and Key Players 2015 – 2025

    In the epoch of automation, the ability to navigate devices and persons has become increasingly important for rising number of applications. With the emergence of GPS (Global Positioning System) the outdoor positioning has become outstanding but many applications require coherent positioning capabilities in all the environments. In view of this, indoor positioning has become a focus of research and development in the past decade. The number of relevant requirement parameters is large like accuracy, integrity, coverage, latency, update rate, availability, costs, robustness, infrastructure, privacy. Along with the diverse number of technologies available, making it further complex to match a suitable technology with an application.

    The navigation, imaging and positioning solutions has number of applications ranging from location based services in indoor environments, detection of lost items at home, ambient assistant living systems, in hospitals for location tracking of patient, medical equipment and personnel in emergency situations, in social networking to govern social integration, environmental monitoring to observe phenomena such as heat, humidity, pressure, air pollution and deformation of structures. WSN (Wireless Sensor Network) is set-up to monitor these parameters in indoor as well as outdoor space via organization of multiple sensor nodes. It has significant benefits in rescue and fire services, law enforcement such as instantaneous detection of theft, crime scene recovery, geofenceing. Mass application is in intelligent transportation to provide seamless navigation for vehicles through extension of road guidance inside parking garages. In industry it plays a critical role in the automatic manufacturing, for the development of intelligent systems. These systems act as an essential functional element in the smart factories for improvement of safety systems, intelligent worker protection and collision avoidance. In Logistics and Optimization, it is quite essential to have information about the location of assets and staff members. In Western economies, one tenth of the GDP contribution comes from navigation systems. In the coming decade the navigation, imaging and positioning solutions market will see a massive boost with the introduction of advanced technologies and satellites.

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    Navigation, Imaging and Positioning Solutions Market: Drivers & Restraints          

    Rising infrastructure investments necessitates the requirement of positioning for cargo management systems for rail traffic, airports and ports. Large construction sites require positioning systems to support the information management system. Aforementioned are some of the key factors driving the growth of the navigation, imaging and positioning solutions market.

    Changes in the allocation of radio frequency bands, cost of sensors, safety, development time and customization associated with the navigation, imaging and positioning solutions, dependency on external suppliers for components are probable factors restraining the growth of the navigation, imaging and positioning solutions market.

    Navigation, Imaging and Positioning Solutions Market: Segmentation

    The global navigation, imaging and positioning solutions market is broadly classified on the basis of applications, physical principle used in the operation and geographies.

    Based on application, the global navigation, imaging and positioning Solutions market is segmented into:

    • Defense
    • Maritime
    • Land & Survey
    • Photonics
    • Space

    Based on physical principle used in the operation, the global navigation, imaging and positioning solutions market is segmented into:

    • Inertial Navigation
    • Mechanical Waves
    • Electromagnetic Waves

    Navigation, Imaging and Positioning Solutions Market: Overview      

    With rapid technological advancements and increasing risks on security; the acceptance of navigation, imaging and positioning solutions is gaining popularity. The global navigation, imaging and positioning solutions market is expected to expand at a promising CAGR during the forecast period (2015-2025).

    Navigation, Imaging and Positioning Solutions Market: Region-wise Outlook          

    The global navigation, imaging and positioning solutions market is expected to register a double-digit CAGR for the forecast period. Depending on geographic regions, global navigation, imaging and positioning solutions market is segmented into seven key regions: North America, South America, Eastern Europe, Western Europe, Asia Pacific, Japan, and Middle East & Africa. As of 2015, North America dominated the global navigation, imaging and positioning solutions market in terms of market revenue followed by Europe and Russia. Asia Pacific & Japan are projected to expand at a substantial growth and will contribute to the global navigation, imaging and positioning solutions market value exhibiting a robust CAGR during the forecast period, 2015?2025.

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    Navigation, Imaging and Positioning Solutions Market: Key Players

    Some of the key market participants in global navigation, imaging and positioning solutions market are Topcon Positioning Systems Inc, iXBlue, Trimble Navigation Limited, Sonardyne, Leica Geosystems, Kongsberg Maritime, NovAtel Inc, BlackRoc Technology.

    Corbus Pharmaceuticals Reports Positive Topline Data Demonstrating Anabasum Reduces Acute Pulmonary Exacerbations and Multiple Inflammatory Biomarkers in Phase 2 Study in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    Anabasum achieves primary study objective of acceptable safety and tolerability; Management to host conference call and webcast today at 8:00 a.m. EDT

    NORWORD, MA–(Marketwired – March 30, 2017) – Corbus Pharmaceuticals Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ: CRBP) („Corbus” or the „Company”), a clinical stage drug development company targeting rare, chronic, serious inflammatory and fibrotic diseases, today announced positive topline data from its Phase 2 study evaluating multiple doses of anabasum (fka JBT-101 or Resunab) compared to placebo for the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis („CF”). The 16-week study dosed 85 adult CF patients with baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) percent predicted ≥ 40%, who were enrolled without regard to their specific CFTR mutation or infecting pathogens and continued with all baseline treatment regimens.

    Anabasum successfully achieved the primary objective of the study by demonstrating an acceptable safety and tolerability profile at all doses with no serious or severe adverse events related to the study drug.

    Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics, Inc. („CFFT”), the non-profit drug discovery and development affiliate of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, supported the Phase 2 study.

    Anabasum cohorts showed a dose-dependent reduction in a number of acute pulmonary exacerbations defined as those requiring intravenous (IV) antibiotics compared to placebo. Patients in the highest dose cohort of anabasum (20 mg orally, twice per day) had a 75% reduction in the annualized rate of pulmonary exacerbations requiring IV antibiotics compared to placebo cohort.

    Additionally, anabasum caused a consistent reduction in multiple inflammatory cell types in sputum, including total leukocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, and macrophages. Inflammatory mediators, including interleukin-8, neutrophil elastase, and immunoglobulin G, were also reduced in sputum by anabasum in a dose-dependent manner. These patient data provide evidence of biological activity of anabasum in resolving ongoing innate immune responses in lungs of CF patients and support the observed reduction in pulmonary exacerbations.

    Serum concentrations of orally-administered anabasum in CF patients were similar to those previously observed in healthy volunteers. FEV1 remained stable throughout the duration of the study in all treatment cohorts.

    „We are delighted that in this first-in-CF patient study, anabasum demonstrated an acceptable safety profile and potential clinical benefit in reducing acute pulmonary exacerbations in CF patients and that these findings are supported by biomarker data consistently showing reduction of inflammation in the lungs,” stated Yuval Cohen, PhD, CEO of Corbus. „These positive results coincide with our third anniversary as a company and come on the heels of positive data from our Phase 2 study in systemic sclerosis. We are very grateful to all the patients, investigators and clinical staff who participated in this study and to Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics for their support.”

    „The reduction in acute pulmonary exacerbations along with reductions in inflammatory cells and inflammatory mediators in sputum demonstrate the potential for anabasum as a new inflammation-targeting therapeutic in cystic fibrosis that can broadly target patients without regard to their specific CFTR mutations. The outcomes of this 16-week study indicate that anabasum has the potential to address the important unmet need for treatments that target inflammation in CF,” commented James Chmiel, M.D., M.P.H., Professor of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University, Associate Director of the LeRoy W. Matthews Cystic Fibrosis Center at University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital in Cleveland, and Principle Investigator of Corbus’ Phase 2 cystic fibrosis clinical study.

    Study Design and Results

    This was an international, multi-center, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase 2 study supported in part by a $5 million Development Award from Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics, Inc. The primary objective of the study was to test safety and tolerability of anabasum in adults with CF who had FEV1 ≥ 40 percent predicted and remained on background CF medications, including prophylactic antibiotics. Patients were enrolled without regard to their CFTR mutation, infecting pathogen, or baseline treatment. Acute pulmonary exacerbations requiring IV antibiotic treatment were captured as an event of special interest during the study. Secondary objectives included measurement of plasma concentrations and metabolites of anabasum and change from baseline in FEV1 percent predicted and Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised Respiratory Symptom score. Additional outcomes included change from baseline in sputum and blood biomarkers of inflammation.

    Eighty-five patients on stable standard-of-care medications were dosed with anabasum or placebo at 21 sites in the U.S. and Europe and treated for 84 days, with a follow-up period of 28 days off treatment. During the first part of the study (Weeks 1-4) patients were randomized to placebo (n = 35), 1 mg/day anabasum (n = 26) or 5 mg/day anabasum (n = 24). During the second part of the study (Weeks 5-12), anabasum patients were randomly assigned to anabasum 20 mg once per day (n = 31) or anabasum 20 mg twice per day (n = 30) with 11 patients from the placebo cohort randomly assigned to the 2 anabasum cohorts. Twenty-four patients continued to receive placebo in Weeks 5-12.

    After dosing, 10 patients discontinued early from the study; 3 patients withdrew consent, 5 withdrew due to adverse events (2 on placebo, 3 on anabasum), 1 subject was lost to follow-up and 2 patients withdrew for treatment-unrelated reasons. Baseline characteristics were similar between anabasum and placebo cohorts.

    Safety

    During Weeks 1-4, treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) occurred in 14 (54%) of patients in the anabasum 1 mg cohort, 13 (54%) of the anabasum 5 mg cohort and 15 (43%) of the placebo cohort. During Weeks 5-12, TEAEs occurred in 21 (68%) patients in the anabasum 20 mg once per day cohort, 19 (63%) of the anabasum 20 mg twice per day cohort and 14 (58%) of the placebo cohort. Six serious adverse events (SAEs) occurred the anabasum-treated patients and 6 SAEs occurred in placebo-treated patients. Three severe TEAEs occurred in the anabasum-treated patients and 4 in placebo-treated patients. None of the serious or severe TEAEs were assessed by site investigators to be related to study drug. The most common drug-related adverse event that occurred in more than 2 individuals was mild dry mouth observed in 8 (13%) of anabasum patients and no placebo patients. As expected, the respiratory system was the most common source of TEAEs overall.

    Cmax values for anabasum were similar to those previously measured in healthy human volunteers after similar doses of anabasum.

    Acute Pulmonary Exacerbations

    Treatment with anabasum yielded a dose-dependent reduction in acute pulmonary exacerbations. The highest dose of anabasum (20 mg twice per day) was associated with a 75% reduction in the annualized rate of pulmonary exacerbations requiring treatment with IV antibiotics, compared to placebo. Similar levels of reduction were also observed in acute pulmonary exacerbations defined by new or worsening respiratory symptoms requiring treatment with any antibiotic.

    Inflammatory Cells and Biomarkers

    Patients treated with anabasum 20 mg twice a day showed a consistent reduction in multiple inflammatory cell types in their sputum at the end of active treatment compared to placebo, including total leukocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes and macrophages. They also had a consistent reduction in inflammatory mediators in their sputum including interleukin-8, neutrophil elastase and immunoglobulin G.

    Next steps

    Barbara White, MD, Chief Medical Officer of Corbus, stated, „We are delighted that anabasum demonstrated a safety profile that was well tolerated by the CF patients in this study, especially given the challenges in safely targeting inflammation in CF. In a study of just 12-weeks of active dosing, we are especially encouraged by the consistency in data that couple clinical benefit in pulmonary exacerbations with improvement in the inflammatory response in the lungs. We believe these findings reflect the underlying mechanism of action of anabasum in activating resolution of innate immune responses without immunosuppression.”

    Corbus will engage in further evaluation of the data and design of the next clinical trial in partnership with CF experts, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics, Inc., Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutic Development Network and European Cystic Fibrosis Society Clinical Trials Network. Thereafter, Corbus will enter into discussions with the relevant regulatory agencies.

    Anabasum was granted Orphan Drug Designation and Fast Track status for the treatment of CF by the FDA in 2015 and Orphan Drug Status from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in 2016.

    For more information on the Phase 2 study with anabasum for the treatment of CF, please visit ClinicalTrials.gov and reference Identifier NCT02465450.

    Conference Call and Webcast Information

    Corbus management will host a conference call for investors, analysts and other interested parties today, March 30, 2017 at 8:00 am EDT to discuss the topline data from the Phase 2 Study evaluating anabasum for the treatment of CF.

    The conference call and live webcast will be accompanied by presentation slides. To participate in the call, please dial (877) 407-3978 (domestic) or (412) 902-0039 (international). The live webcast and accompanying slides will be accessible on the Events page of the Investors section of Corbus website, www.corbuspharma.com, and will be archived for 60 days.

    About Cystic Fibrosis

    Cystic Fibrosis („CF”) is a chronic, life-threatening, genetic disease caused by inheriting two dysfunctional CFTR genes that normally regulate salt and water movement across cells in the respiratory and digestive systems. CF affects approximately 30,000 patients in the U.S and 75,000 patients worldwide. People with CF have thick, sticky mucus that clogs their airways, with recurrent bacterial infections and chronic inflammation in their lungs. In the gastrointestinal tract, they also have mucus accumulation, bacterial overgrowth, and inflammation. The dysfunctional CFTR genes cause an exaggerated inflammatory response that compounds the damage from a coexisting infection in the lungs and gut. CF results in destruction of lung tissue, lung fibrosis, pancreatic insufficiency, CF-related diabetes, malabsorption, malnutrition, growth retardation, and liver disease, including cirrhosis. The harmful inflammation and accompanying fibrosis in CF damages multiple organs, impairs organ function, reduces health-related quality of life, and can lead to death.

    About Anabasum

    Anabasum is a novel synthetic oral endocannabinoid-mimetic drug that preferentially binds to the CB2 receptor expressed on activated immune cells and fibroblasts. CB2 activation triggers endogenous pathways that resolve inflammation and halt fibrosis. Preclinical and Phase 1 studies have shown anabasum to have a favorable safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetic profile. It has also demonstrated promising potency in preclinical models of inflammation and fibrosis. Anabasum is designed to trigger the production of „Specialized Pro-resolving Lipid Mediators” that activate an endogenous cascade responsible for the resolution of inflammation and fibrosis, while reducing production of multiple inflammatory mediators. Anabasum has direct effects on fibroblasts to halt tissue scarring. In effect, anabasum triggers endogenous pathways to turn „off” chronic inflammation and fibrotic processes, without causing immunosuppression.

    About Corbus

    Corbus Pharmaceuticals Holdings, Inc. is a clinical stage pharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of novel therapeutics to treat rare, chronic, and serious inflammatory and fibrotic diseases. Our lead product candidate, anabasum, is a novel synthetic oral endocannabinoid-mimetic drug designed to resolve chronic inflammation, and fibrotic processes. Anabasum is currently in Phase 2 clinical studies for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis and skin-predominant dermatomyositis, with a fourth Phase 2 trial in systemic lupus erythematosus planned to commence during the first half of 2017.

    For more information, please visit www.CorbusPharma.com and connect with the Company on Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ and Facebook.

    Forward-Looking Statements

    This press release contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Private Securities Litigation Reform Act, as amended, including those relating to the Company’s product development, clinical trials, clinical and regulatory timelines, market opportunity, competitive position, possible or assumed future results of operations, business strategies, potential growth opportunities and other statement that are predictive in nature. These forward-looking statements are based on current expectations, estimates, forecasts and projections about the industry and markets in which we operate and management’s current beliefs and assumptions.

    These statements may be identified by the use of forward-looking expressions, including, but not limited to, „expect,” „anticipate,” „intend,” „plan,” „believe,” „estimate,” „potential,” „predict,” „project,” „should,” „would” and similar expressions and the negatives of those terms. These statements relate to future events or our financial performance and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors which may cause actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Such factors include those set forth in the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Prospective investors are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this press release. The Company undertakes no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

    Corbus Pharmaceuticals Reports Positive Topline Data Demonstrating Anabasum Reduces Acute Pulmonary Exacerbations and Multiple Inflammatory Biomarkers in Phase 2 Study in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    Anabasum achieves primary study objective of acceptable safety and tolerability; Management to host conference call and webcast today at 8:00 a.m. EDT

    NORWORD, MA–(Marketwired – March 30, 2017) – Corbus Pharmaceuticals Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ: CRBP) („Corbus” or the „Company”), a clinical stage drug development company targeting rare, chronic, serious inflammatory and fibrotic diseases, today announced positive topline data from its Phase 2 study evaluating multiple doses of anabasum (fka JBT-101 or Resunab) compared to placebo for the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis („CF”). The 16-week study dosed 85 adult CF patients with baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) percent predicted ≥ 40%, who were enrolled without regard to their specific CFTR mutation or infecting pathogens and continued with all baseline treatment regimens.

    Anabasum successfully achieved the primary objective of the study by demonstrating an acceptable safety and tolerability profile at all doses with no serious or severe adverse events related to the study drug.

    Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics, Inc. („CFFT”), the non-profit drug discovery and development affiliate of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, supported the Phase 2 study.

    Anabasum cohorts showed a dose-dependent reduction in a number of acute pulmonary exacerbations defined as those requiring intravenous (IV) antibiotics compared to placebo. Patients in the highest dose cohort of anabasum (20 mg orally, twice per day) had a 75% reduction in the annualized rate of pulmonary exacerbations requiring IV antibiotics compared to placebo cohort.

    Additionally, anabasum caused a consistent reduction in multiple inflammatory cell types in sputum, including total leukocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, and macrophages. Inflammatory mediators, including interleukin-8, neutrophil elastase, and immunoglobulin G, were also reduced in sputum by anabasum in a dose-dependent manner. These patient data provide evidence of biological activity of anabasum in resolving ongoing innate immune responses in lungs of CF patients and support the observed reduction in pulmonary exacerbations.

    Serum concentrations of orally-administered anabasum in CF patients were similar to those previously observed in healthy volunteers. FEV1 remained stable throughout the duration of the study in all treatment cohorts.

    „We are delighted that in this first-in-CF patient study, anabasum demonstrated an acceptable safety profile and potential clinical benefit in reducing acute pulmonary exacerbations in CF patients and that these findings are supported by biomarker data consistently showing reduction of inflammation in the lungs,” stated Yuval Cohen, PhD, CEO of Corbus. „These positive results coincide with our third anniversary as a company and come on the heels of positive data from our Phase 2 study in systemic sclerosis. We are very grateful to all the patients, investigators and clinical staff who participated in this study and to Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics for their support.”

    „The reduction in acute pulmonary exacerbations along with reductions in inflammatory cells and inflammatory mediators in sputum demonstrate the potential for anabasum as a new inflammation-targeting therapeutic in cystic fibrosis that can broadly target patients without regard to their specific CFTR mutations. The outcomes of this 16-week study indicate that anabasum has the potential to address the important unmet need for treatments that target inflammation in CF,” commented James Chmiel, M.D., M.P.H., Professor of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University, Associate Director of the LeRoy W. Matthews Cystic Fibrosis Center at University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital in Cleveland, and Principle Investigator of Corbus’ Phase 2 cystic fibrosis clinical study.

    Study Design and Results

    This was an international, multi-center, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase 2 study supported in part by a $5 million Development Award from Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics, Inc. The primary objective of the study was to test safety and tolerability of anabasum in adults with CF who had FEV1 ≥ 40 percent predicted and remained on background CF medications, including prophylactic antibiotics. Patients were enrolled without regard to their CFTR mutation, infecting pathogen, or baseline treatment. Acute pulmonary exacerbations requiring IV antibiotic treatment were captured as an event of special interest during the study. Secondary objectives included measurement of plasma concentrations and metabolites of anabasum and change from baseline in FEV1 percent predicted and Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised Respiratory Symptom score. Additional outcomes included change from baseline in sputum and blood biomarkers of inflammation.

    Eighty-five patients on stable standard-of-care medications were dosed with anabasum or placebo at 21 sites in the U.S. and Europe and treated for 84 days, with a follow-up period of 28 days off treatment. During the first part of the study (Weeks 1-4) patients were randomized to placebo (n = 35), 1 mg/day anabasum (n = 26) or 5 mg/day anabasum (n = 24). During the second part of the study (Weeks 5-12), anabasum patients were randomly assigned to anabasum 20 mg once per day (n = 31) or anabasum 20 mg twice per day (n = 30) with 11 patients from the placebo cohort randomly assigned to the 2 anabasum cohorts. Twenty-four patients continued to receive placebo in Weeks 5-12.

    After dosing, 10 patients discontinued early from the study; 3 patients withdrew consent, 5 withdrew due to adverse events (2 on placebo, 3 on anabasum), 1 subject was lost to follow-up and 2 patients withdrew for treatment-unrelated reasons. Baseline characteristics were similar between anabasum and placebo cohorts.

    Safety

    During Weeks 1-4, treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) occurred in 14 (54%) of patients in the anabasum 1 mg cohort, 13 (54%) of the anabasum 5 mg cohort and 15 (43%) of the placebo cohort. During Weeks 5-12, TEAEs occurred in 21 (68%) patients in the anabasum 20 mg once per day cohort, 19 (63%) of the anabasum 20 mg twice per day cohort and 14 (58%) of the placebo cohort. Six serious adverse events (SAEs) occurred the anabasum-treated patients and 6 SAEs occurred in placebo-treated patients. Three severe TEAEs occurred in the anabasum-treated patients and 4 in placebo-treated patients. None of the serious or severe TEAEs were assessed by site investigators to be related to study drug. The most common drug-related adverse event that occurred in more than 2 individuals was mild dry mouth observed in 8 (13%) of anabasum patients and no placebo patients. As expected, the respiratory system was the most common source of TEAEs overall.

    Cmax values for anabasum were similar to those previously measured in healthy human volunteers after similar doses of anabasum.

    Acute Pulmonary Exacerbations

    Treatment with anabasum yielded a dose-dependent reduction in acute pulmonary exacerbations. The highest dose of anabasum (20 mg twice per day) was associated with a 75% reduction in the annualized rate of pulmonary exacerbations requiring treatment with IV antibiotics, compared to placebo. Similar levels of reduction were also observed in acute pulmonary exacerbations defined by new or worsening respiratory symptoms requiring treatment with any antibiotic.

    Inflammatory Cells and Biomarkers

    Patients treated with anabasum 20 mg twice a day showed a consistent reduction in multiple inflammatory cell types in their sputum at the end of active treatment compared to placebo, including total leukocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes and macrophages. They also had a consistent reduction in inflammatory mediators in their sputum including interleukin-8, neutrophil elastase and immunoglobulin G.

    Next steps

    Barbara White, MD, Chief Medical Officer of Corbus, stated, „We are delighted that anabasum demonstrated a safety profile that was well tolerated by the CF patients in this study, especially given the challenges in safely targeting inflammation in CF. In a study of just 12-weeks of active dosing, we are especially encouraged by the consistency in data that couple clinical benefit in pulmonary exacerbations with improvement in the inflammatory response in the lungs. We believe these findings reflect the underlying mechanism of action of anabasum in activating resolution of innate immune responses without immunosuppression.”

    Corbus will engage in further evaluation of the data and design of the next clinical trial in partnership with CF experts, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics, Inc., Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutic Development Network and European Cystic Fibrosis Society Clinical Trials Network. Thereafter, Corbus will enter into discussions with the relevant regulatory agencies.

    Anabasum was granted Orphan Drug Designation and Fast Track status for the treatment of CF by the FDA in 2015 and Orphan Drug Status from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in 2016.

    For more information on the Phase 2 study with anabasum for the treatment of CF, please visit ClinicalTrials.gov and reference Identifier NCT02465450.

    Conference Call and Webcast Information

    Corbus management will host a conference call for investors, analysts and other interested parties today, March 30, 2017 at 8:00 am EDT to discuss the topline data from the Phase 2 Study evaluating anabasum for the treatment of CF.

    The conference call and live webcast will be accompanied by presentation slides. To participate in the call, please dial (877) 407-3978 (domestic) or (412) 902-0039 (international). The live webcast and accompanying slides will be accessible on the Events page of the Investors section of Corbus website, www.corbuspharma.com, and will be archived for 60 days.

    About Cystic Fibrosis

    Cystic Fibrosis („CF”) is a chronic, life-threatening, genetic disease caused by inheriting two dysfunctional CFTR genes that normally regulate salt and water movement across cells in the respiratory and digestive systems. CF affects approximately 30,000 patients in the U.S and 75,000 patients worldwide. People with CF have thick, sticky mucus that clogs their airways, with recurrent bacterial infections and chronic inflammation in their lungs. In the gastrointestinal tract, they also have mucus accumulation, bacterial overgrowth, and inflammation. The dysfunctional CFTR genes cause an exaggerated inflammatory response that compounds the damage from a coexisting infection in the lungs and gut. CF results in destruction of lung tissue, lung fibrosis, pancreatic insufficiency, CF-related diabetes, malabsorption, malnutrition, growth retardation, and liver disease, including cirrhosis. The harmful inflammation and accompanying fibrosis in CF damages multiple organs, impairs organ function, reduces health-related quality of life, and can lead to death.

    About Anabasum

    Anabasum is a novel synthetic oral endocannabinoid-mimetic drug that preferentially binds to the CB2 receptor expressed on activated immune cells and fibroblasts. CB2 activation triggers endogenous pathways that resolve inflammation and halt fibrosis. Preclinical and Phase 1 studies have shown anabasum to have a favorable safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetic profile. It has also demonstrated promising potency in preclinical models of inflammation and fibrosis. Anabasum is designed to trigger the production of „Specialized Pro-resolving Lipid Mediators” that activate an endogenous cascade responsible for the resolution of inflammation and fibrosis, while reducing production of multiple inflammatory mediators. Anabasum has direct effects on fibroblasts to halt tissue scarring. In effect, anabasum triggers endogenous pathways to turn „off” chronic inflammation and fibrotic processes, without causing immunosuppression.

    About Corbus

    Corbus Pharmaceuticals Holdings, Inc. is a clinical stage pharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of novel therapeutics to treat rare, chronic, and serious inflammatory and fibrotic diseases. Our lead product candidate, anabasum, is a novel synthetic oral endocannabinoid-mimetic drug designed to resolve chronic inflammation, and fibrotic processes. Anabasum is currently in Phase 2 clinical studies for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis and skin-predominant dermatomyositis, with a fourth Phase 2 trial in systemic lupus erythematosus planned to commence during the first half of 2017.

    For more information, please visit www.CorbusPharma.com and connect with the Company on Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ and Facebook.

    Forward-Looking Statements

    This press release contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Private Securities Litigation Reform Act, as amended, including those relating to the Company’s product development, clinical trials, clinical and regulatory timelines, market opportunity, competitive position, possible or assumed future results of operations, business strategies, potential growth opportunities and other statement that are predictive in nature. These forward-looking statements are based on current expectations, estimates, forecasts and projections about the industry and markets in which we operate and management’s current beliefs and assumptions.

    These statements may be identified by the use of forward-looking expressions, including, but not limited to, „expect,” „anticipate,” „intend,” „plan,” „believe,” „estimate,” „potential,” „predict,” „project,” „should,” „would” and similar expressions and the negatives of those terms. These statements relate to future events or our financial performance and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors which may cause actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Such factors include those set forth in the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Prospective investors are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this press release. The Company undertakes no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.